Wuyi brewing in a gaiwan?

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Feb 14th, '08, 00:44
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wuyi brewing a gaiwan

by teasbest » Feb 14th, '08, 00:44

thanks, but I'm not satisfied with the brews that I'm
getting and am getting discouraged.

oh, sorry that I didn't say, but I don't use a gaiwan.
I use a brewing basket, (finum) in a mug. that is why
I need measurements.

I want to be successful at this method before even considering
a gaiwan.

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Feb 14th, '08, 00:47
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by scruffmcgruff » Feb 14th, '08, 00:47

If you could provide us with some measurements of your own, for example, how big your mug is, we might be able to help.

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Feb 14th, '08, 00:49
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by Eastree » Feb 14th, '08, 00:49

Some people recommend 3grams for 100ml water, as a starting place. Some recommend 5grams. It depends on the tea and several other factors.

As far as holding off on a gaiwan, I can understand except that you can acquire one for little money. A couple ebay vendors sell them in the $4 range.

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Feb 14th, '08, 01:09
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by ABx » Feb 14th, '08, 01:09

teabest: One thing about Wuyi is that each different Wuyi yancha can be a bit different. I have some that are really best brewed almost western style, and others that are best with huge amount of leaf. So giving exact parameters might be hard without more information. What are you trying to brew, and what vendor was it from? As Scruff mentioned, it would help to get a better idea of what you're using to brew it. Also, what about water temperature, and are you pre-heating?

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Feb 14th, '08, 01:17
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by ABx » Feb 14th, '08, 01:17

Eastree wrote:As far as holding off on a gaiwan, I can understand except that you can acquire one for little money. A couple ebay vendors sell them in the $4 range.
Indeed, and a gaiwan can also sometimes make things a lot easier.

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Mar 23rd, '08, 06:57
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by chrl42 » Mar 23rd, '08, 06:57

I think gaiwan is suitable for just any kind of tea. One of reasons I brew with yixing teapot is, for oolong and puerh, it might burn my fingers with such high temperature of water.

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