Pouchong oolongians

Owes its flavors to oxidation levels between green & black tea.

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May 30th 08 12:18 am
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Pouchong oolongians

by Salsero » May 30th 08 12:18 am

How do you brew Baozhong (Pouchong)? I don't think I am getting as much from it as I should. I have been working with
  • TeaCuppa's WenShan BZ (which seems pretty roasted)
    Floating Leaves BZ, Second Place
    Floating Leaves BZ, Honorable Mention
They are all old harvest rather than the 2008 Spring. My impression is that people brew this stuff all over the scale. I have been doing about 4 or 5 grams in 6 oz, off boil, doing anything from 1 minute to 3 minutes for the first infusion. How can I squeeze the most out of this?

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May 30th 08 12:39 am
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by chrl42 » May 30th 08 12:39 am

I remember I brewed that in gaiwan when I didn't have a yixing.
I brewed that like a green and a result was fine.
Temperature should be higher since their leaves are large.
I don't know how people brew that in yixings.

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by trent » May 30th 08 1:21 am

I had some baozhong today that came out great. Here are the parameters I use:

Rinse Gaiwan/cups w/ boiling water
Fill gaiwan ~1/3 full w/ leaves

(Pour boiling water directly on leaves in all infusions)
1. 2 min
2. 1:30
3. 3:30
4. 6:00
5. stop brewing before the water in the gaiwan is cool
NOTE: I usually brew until I can taste a slight (very very slight) astringency. If the tea tastes underbrewed, I'll throw it back in the gaiwan for a little bit. Also, If a baozhong has to "light" of a body (feels too thin in my mouth) I'll try brewing it in a yixing.

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by RussianSoul » May 30th 08 3:05 am

I feel funny giving suggestions before TeaChat Oolong gurus have spoken. But here's what I do.

I brew my Baozhong western style in an unglazed tokoname teapot: 1g to 2oz ratio, 190F, 3min, 3min, 4min, 6min.

But I have tried only two Baozhongs so far: from Tao of Tea and Adagio's Pouchong. The Baozhong from ToT gives consistent pleasant result with this approach. Adagio's Pouchong misbehaves, sometimes it comes out sweet with a nice tang, other times too astringent for my taste.

So I too am waiting to hear recommendations and wisdom.

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by henley » Jun 29th 08 9:48 am

I got a sample of Adagio's Pouchong w/my last order & this has easily become one of my favorite oolongs. I brew western style, too (yeah, :shock: I know). I use 1 tsp per cup (6-8 oz) water, 170* & 5 min, 5 min, 7 min, 10 min. I can easily get 4 steeps & sometimes 5.

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by Victoria » Jun 29th 08 3:21 pm

Ohhh that Floating Leaves BZ, Second Place is one of my absolute favorites.
No rinsing. In a 15oz pot, just off boil for 3 mins. Second infustion 5 min. My stash is at work so I can't weigh it, but about 2 tablespoons.

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by ABx » Jun 29th 08 5:51 pm

Baozhong is one that I've found, above most others, benefits from gongfu.

Stephane from TeaMasters has a good video:
http://www.vidilife.com/index.cfm?f=med ... 78A-91E3-9
I've found that pressing the leaves in the hand as he does actually does make a noticeable improvement. You don't crush them, just press a little firmly.

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by Salsero » Jun 29th 08 7:37 pm

ABx wrote:Baozhong is one that I've found, above most others, benefits from gongfu.
As usual, ABx, you are the tea master and chief reference librarian all rolled into one! I didn't even know that Stéphane had made any videos!

I don't think I have ever done a fresh Baozhong gong fu, just the aged ones. I've been leaning more in Victoria's direction with the light oolongs lately: Euro style.

Now that you've mentioned it, I certainly will try it. Thanks for the tip. Enough leaf to fill the vessel when fully infused?

(BTW, I have been re-reading your Puerh treatise: it really is great. I especially like the personal feel I get from it, i.e. that these are your thoughts and observations. Much wisdom and experience in those pages.)

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by Katrina » Jul 4th 08 1:11 am

I just reviewed a Pouchong from Aura Teas (their Formosa Wenshan Baochong Choice). I used 1 1/2 tsp per 6 ounces and used water just off boiling. I did a flash rinse and did 4 infusions: 1 minute, 1:20, 1:40, and 2:00. These were their recommendations and I was pretty happy with it.

I'm going to keep playing around with it but a successful first attempt is always nice.

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by henley » Jul 9th 08 9:56 pm

I'm new to Pouchong/Baozhong & not used to doing more than 2 infusions. But this stuff seems to last forever! Started drinking it at 12:00 today & just finished the last steep. I lost count but it may have been 6. Is it normal for the tea to be darker at the end of than when it began?

12:00 vs 5:00
Image Image

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by PolyhymnianMuse » Jul 10th 08 3:37 am

henley wrote: Is it normal for the tea to be darker at the end of than when it began?
I find this to be the case a lot with teas meant for long sessions/many steeps. I have to say moreso in puerh but I also have had some oolongs that started out close to clear water and ended up quite dark at the end.

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by Salsero » Jul 10th 08 4:46 am

henley wrote: Is it normal for the tea to be darker at the end of than when it began?
I rarely do less than 3 infusions of any tea. With oolongs and greens I find most often the 2nd or 3rd steep is the darkest and often the strongest tasting. Sheng Puerh, Dan Cong, and Bao Zhong seem to be the long distance runners, often coming in at 10+ infusions. In my experience, however, they tend to become lighter in color after #3 or #4, but every tea is different.

Thanks for the illustrated note. Nice pix, they really illustrate your statement well.

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by tenuki » Jul 10th 08 5:31 am

:shock:

I can't believe the way everyone is brewing baozhongs western style. Just, wow, you are really missing out.
Last edited by tenuki on Jul 10th 08 7:19 am, edited 1 time in total.

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by Chip » Jul 10th 08 6:45 am

Image 8)

Wenshan Baozhong is definitely at or near the top of my NON GREEN tea list.

Not an oolong tea
nor a japanese green tea
best of both worlds

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by insanitylater » Jul 10th 08 6:53 am

ABx wrote: Stephane from TeaMasters has a good video:
http://www.vidilife.com/index.cfm?f=med ... 78A-91E3-9
she has such manly hands :lol:
just playing