Pouchong oolongians

Owes its flavors to oxidation levels between green & black tea.


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Jul 10th, '08, 03:33
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by tenuki » Jul 10th, '08, 03:33

ABx wrote: I've found that pressing the leaves in the hand as he does actually does make a noticeable improvement. You don't crush them, just press a little firmly.
I think that just lets you put more leaf in the pot, ie '1/3 full' has more leaves. I don't press, but fill my gaiwan or YiXing at least half full. I'll try pressing them and see if my theory is right. I'm only considering the idea because it comes from Stephane. :) Usually breaking tea leaves adds bitterness so I use extreme care with a scoop and avoid using my hands on dried leaves.

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Jul 10th, '08, 03:49
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by tenuki » Jul 10th, '08, 03:49

Chip wrote: Wenshan Baozhong is Not an oolong tea
Reeally? Interesting..... :?

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Jul 10th, '08, 05:52
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by Chip » Jul 10th, '08, 05:52

tenuki wrote:
Chip wrote: Wenshan Baozhong is Not an oolong tea
Reeally? Interesting..... :?
Paraphrasing can twist the original meaning considerably. I did NOT say what you quoted...exactly.

Pouchong in some circles is simply green oolong, not oxidized enough to be a true oolong...others call it true oolong. It is a grey area. I am not saying it is "NOT" oolong per se.

You took words out of my "haiku" and paraphrased to suit your purpose.

In the context of my poor excuse for a haiku, it is not incorrect. I was expressing the marriage of green and oolong qualities to make a unique and beautiful tea.

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Jul 10th, '08, 12:59
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by tenuki » Jul 10th, '08, 12:59

I didn't know it was a haiku since the last line has 4 syllables.

:wink:

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Jul 10th, '08, 14:18
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by Chip » Jul 10th, '08, 14:18

tenuki wrote:I didn't know it was a haiku since the last line has 4 syllables.

:wink:
Worlds is pronounced somewhat as 2 (in my mind at the time...I even pronounced it a few times and said, sure...it is "like" 2 syllables)....kind of like the pouchong...an enigma. But I am no haiku specialist. :roll:

The point was however...it was a tribute to Wenshan Baozhong. And it makes me smile. :D

Mar 9th, '16, 02:09
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Re: Pouchong oolongians

by ahasja » Mar 9th, '16, 02:09

Yesterday for the first time, I drank a Pouchong. As I never drank one befor, I looke it up here in the forum and found this thread. Also the last reply was some years ago, I would like to continue / to reanimate it.

So, yesterday I started drinking the Wenshan Baozhong Winter Secret Garden from Taiwan Tea Crafts. Anyone knows this one? I did it as was written on the package. Boiled water (95°C) and 3 minutes steeping in a procelain teapot. As no recommended amount was given, I used 6g on 200ml. I did four steeping like that. I encountered a pleasent sweetness and something like a creaminess - not like milk but very smooth. And this morning I tried different parameters. I used again 6g on 200ml, but this time the steepings were 45sec, 45sec, 1 min, 2 min. The first brewing was very sweet. There was no smooth long aftertase but the sweetness was much more pronounced. The second brewing was disappointing - very flat. The 3rd and 4th brewing were better, but nothing to be excited about.

And then I looked a bit in youtube for videos about Pouchong and found this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4hG1tQ ... 4F1C1AB7E1 - there they propose two different kind of brewing methods. The second one sound crazy: Letting the tea steep in a gaiwan for 10 minutes. The first suggestion I'll try tomorrow: Using just 90°C hot water, steeping to 60, 20, 45, 80, 140 sec.

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Mar 9th, '16, 06:42
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Re: Pouchong oolongians

by jayinhk » Mar 9th, '16, 06:42

90C gongfu brewing is what I saw in Pinglin. You wanna fill the gaiwan to 2/3 with leaf.

Mar 9th, '16, 10:55
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Pouchong oolongians

by ahasja » Mar 9th, '16, 10:55

jayinhk wrote:90C gongfu brewing is what I saw in Pinglin. You wanna fill the gaiwan to 2/3 with leaf.
And then 45 sec +15 +15 etc?

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Mar 9th, '16, 11:22
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Re: Pouchong oolongians

by jayinhk » Mar 9th, '16, 11:22

Unfortunately I don't remember the length of each brew as I was preoccupied at the time, but I'd start with 20-30 seconds and go up from there.

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Re: Pouchong oolongians

by ethan » Mar 9th, '16, 13:35

I think all infusions were about 30 seconds; however, the people preparing seemed very relaxed about the process. Of course, they work w/ tea all day.

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Mar 9th, '16, 13:59
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Re: Pouchong oolongians

by wyardley » Mar 9th, '16, 13:59

Depends on the type of baozhong, its quality, and your preferences. Even the extremely green style of baozhong should be able to take boiling water if it's of very good quality, however, you may get slightly more fruity notes brewed a little cooler. If the tea is of moderate or lower quality, using lower temp water will definitely help improve the taste. My rule of thumb with basically any oolong is to start at full boil, and back off next time if you find the taste too vegetal (unfortunately, if you "cook" the tea, it may still not taste great even if you back off on subsequent infusions of the same leaf).

The parameters used for testing whether the tea is good or not (where you'd almost always want to use near-boiling or boiling water) might be different from those you might choose to flatter the tea.

Timing and amount of leaf should really be to taste there's no "right" formula.

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Mar 9th, '16, 16:09
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Re: Pouchong oolongians

by tenuki » Mar 9th, '16, 16:09

and the dead walk again. This must be some kinda record for thread resurrection.

Mar 10th, '16, 08:34
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Pouchong oolongians

by ahasja » Mar 10th, '16, 08:34

tenuki wrote:and the dead walk again. This must be some kinda record for thread resurrection.
As tea never gets boring, so no discussion about tea has a real end.

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