gaiwan vs. gaibei??

Discussion on virtually any teaware related item.


Sep 30th, '09, 23:00
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gaiwan vs. gaibei??

by coconut » Sep 30th, '09, 23:00

I have seen online a gaiwan with a spout and ceramic filter. Does anyone use this? Any advantages over regular gaiwans?

Thanks

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Sep 30th, '09, 23:35
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Re: gaiwan vs. gaibei??

by Chip » Sep 30th, '09, 23:35

"Gaiwan for Dummies!"

Good thing I have some ... they are actually nice. Kind of half gaiwan, half teapot.

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Oct 1st, '09, 13:40
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Re: gaiwan vs. gaibei??

by tingjunkie » Oct 1st, '09, 13:40

The obvious advantages are that it's easier to hold (as most of them that I've seen have thick finger holds on the rim), and you don't have to worry about finding the balance between creating a gap between lid and body large enough for the tea to pour out quickly without the leaves coming with it.

As far as brewing performance, I can't comment. Never tried one. To me they look like an excellent idea, but some around here seem to poke fun at them- maybe they have a good reason aside from personal aesthetics? I'll let the detracters chime in with their own opinions. :D

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Aug 7th, '13, 21:01
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Re: gaiwan vs. gaibei??

by bambooforest » Aug 7th, '13, 21:01

What's a good source to purchase a gaibei? I'm looking for one.

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Aug 7th, '13, 21:24
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Re: gaiwan vs. gaibei??

by tst » Aug 7th, '13, 21:24

For some reason, I always thought a gaiwan w the same thing as a gaibei. Anyone care to post some pics?

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Aug 8th, '13, 05:14
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Re: gaiwan vs. gaibei??

by Tead Off » Aug 8th, '13, 05:14

tst wrote:For some reason, I always thought a gaiwan w the same thing as a gaibei. Anyone care to post some pics?

I've never seen one of these.

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Aug 8th, '13, 06:55
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Re: gaiwan vs. gaibei??

by sherubtse » Aug 8th, '13, 06:55

Here is an article that states they are the same. The difference in name is due to a difference between northern and southern speakers.

http://www.teance.com/category-s/54.htm

Best wishes,
sherubtse

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Aug 8th, '13, 09:07
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Re: gaiwan vs. gaibei??

by JRS22 » Aug 8th, '13, 09:07

Interesting article. My TAD was flaring up but if a gaibei is the same as a gaiwan then there's nothin new I need to add to my teaware collection (this week).

The author talks about the historical use of the saucer as an aid in serving tea without burning one's hands. There was another thread in which some posters seemed to think it was considered rude in China to use the saucer when pouring. Not an issue for me since no one with that much tea knowledge ever comes to my home for tea, but I suppose if I ever travel to China I can use the saucer without fear.

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Aug 8th, '13, 10:17
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Re: gaiwan vs. gaibei??

by Joel Byron » Aug 8th, '13, 10:17

While a gaiwan and a gaibei are apparently the same thing, I think the OP was referring to something like this:

http://tinyurl.com/lrqmh5z

Sort of like a houhin I suppose.

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Aug 8th, '13, 10:22
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Re: gaiwan vs. gaibei??

by Tead Off » Aug 8th, '13, 10:22

When I google gaibei, they show a porcelain cup with an attached lid that has another lid which slides open to reveal a multi-holed filter. They show someone drinking from it directly and also pouring the contents into a cup. It is clearly not the same as a gaiwan.

For all the Chinese users of gaiwan that I've seen, maybe a very small percentage have picked it up by the saucer. Could be a regional usage, not sure. Haven't seen anyone arrested for this, yet.

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Aug 8th, '13, 11:23
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Re: gaiwan vs. gaibei??

by Joel Byron » Aug 8th, '13, 11:23

Here is a more gaiwan-esque one on ebay:

http://tinyurl.com/mzql9x8

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Aug 8th, '13, 12:47
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Re: gaiwan vs. gaibei??

by Tead Off » Aug 8th, '13, 12:47

Joel Byron wrote:Here is a more gaiwan-esque one on ebay:

http://tinyurl.com/mzql9x8

I've also seen this type with handles. All the elegance of the gaiwan is gone for me in this design.

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Aug 8th, '13, 13:08
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Re: gaiwan vs. gaibei??

by Evan Draper » Aug 8th, '13, 13:08

Tead Off wrote:When I google gaibei, they show a porcelain cup with an attached lid that has another lid which slides open to reveal a multi-holed filter. They show someone drinking from it directly and also pouring the contents into a cup. It is clearly not the same as a gaiwan.

And when I google gaibei, I get that crazy slidy thing you're talking about, the lidded infuser mugs, and traditional gaiwans. Even less slidys turn up when I google 盖杯 instead. Obvs gaiwan and gaibei WERE the same thing, before people started to invent many different kinds of "lidded cups," at which point "gaibei" covers a larger, murkier territory.

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Aug 8th, '13, 13:36
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Re: gaiwan vs. gaibei??

by bambooforest » Aug 8th, '13, 13:36

'gaibei' refers to a gaiwan with a spout and sometimes a handle in the back like a teapot. It ultimately doesn't matter what the original Chinese means because we are using the word in the context of the English language.

Regarding the elegance of the design being compromised.... my perspective is these will not break nearly as often. Your hands won't be as susceptible to burning and accidents. And it's just easier to use.

I still love gaiwans and will use gaiwans, but there is certainly something to be said for the ease of use of a gaibei.

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Aug 11th, '13, 09:51
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Re: gaiwan vs. gaibei??

by Teaism » Aug 11th, '13, 09:51

hmmm...let me share some information on this topic.

In the Song Dynasty, the tea drinkers in Central and Northern China drank tea from bowl. The culture also spread to Japan which evolved into matcha style of tea drinking. The bowl they used was called temmoku bowl.

In Chinese language, 'wan' is bowl. Subsequently the lid was added to cover the top and base of the bowl. In Chinese language, 'gai' is lid. So, in direct translation Gaiwan is lidded bowl. The Gaiwan was use mostly to drink tea and then it was later used to brew tea. You can see in some Chinese movies where tea was served in Gaiwan. Brewing tea with Gaiwan then evolved and become common in Central and Northern China.

Later in around Ming Dynasty, the use of Gaiwan spread to the South. In the South, chaozhou gungfu style was very popular. Small teapots and small teacups were use in the Southern style. The Gaiwan, although very efficient was too big for the Southern style of brewing, the size was then moderated to smaller size to suit the Southern style. The bowl has evolved into smaller size to cup size which mean 'bei' in Mandarin. Gaibei is actually lidded cup, which is smaller than Gaiwan, although their design is exactly the same.

In modern era, both have evolved in many variations, eg. with side handle, spout etc., but generally when we refer to Gaiwan and Gaibei, they are still the same traditional design in different sizes.

It is also interesting to note that when Zisha teapot influence went North, the size got bigger. So, many of the old bigger Zisha pots are tailored for the Northern tea drinkers.

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