Favourite Yixing teapot shape

Discussion on virtually any teaware related item.


What is your favourite Yixing teapot shape?

De Zhong
1
2%
Duo Qiu
3
6%
Fang Gu
5
9%
Han Bian
0
No votes
Liu Fang
0
No votes
Li Xing
2
4%
Qing Quan
0
No votes
Rou Bian
0
No votes
Rong Tian
0
No votes
Shi Piao
2
4%
Shui Ping/Biao Zhun
23
43%
Tai Jian
1
2%
Tseng Lan
0
No votes
Wen Dan
1
2%
Xi Shi
15
28%
Other
0
No votes
 
Total votes: 53

User avatar
May 18th, '14, 01:01
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Re: Favourite Yixing teapot shape

by Tead Off » May 18th, '14, 01:01

Si Ting and related pots are seen with and without metal (brass, gold, etc.) rims on spout and mouth from the Qing period onwards. Here in SE Asia, you see many like this. It's not clear to me whether they are for protection, aesthetics, or for covering chips. Maybe for all these reasons. They can really accent a lovely teapot.
Qing.jpg
Qing.jpg (38.01 KiB) Viewed 462 times

User avatar
May 18th, '14, 21:47
Posts: 1777
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Location: Beijing

Re: Favourite Yixing teapot shape

by chrl42 » May 18th, '14, 21:47

Tead Off wrote:Si Ting and related pots are seen with and without metal (brass, gold, etc.) rims on spout and mouth from the Qing period onwards. Here in SE Asia, you see many like this. It's not clear to me whether they are for protection, aesthetics, or for covering chips. Maybe for all these reasons. They can really accent a lovely teapot.
Qing.jpg

No offense.

But I think those pots are later-rimmed pots, later-rimming is mostly to 'hide' broken spots of pots.

Left one is called Lian Zi, it's a shape exported for Japan, tracing since late-Daoguang period. There were specific shapes the Japanese liked and Lian Zi is one of them.

Right one is Daoguang period's typical Gongfu Zhuni. That shi-huang Zhuni is mid-Qing's trait, which later Zhuni (including late-Qing) are unlikely to follow the beauty of the color.


Those SE asian rimming is somewhat later. Which I think related to their ethnic preference, but unlike bronze rims, gold rims are not oxidated in color over time..so I could be wrong :D

User avatar
May 18th, '14, 22:20
Posts: 1777
Joined: Mar 22nd, '08
Location: Beijing

Re: Favourite Yixing teapot shape

by chrl42 » May 18th, '14, 22:20

bagua7 wrote:Image
Anyone using any of these? What kind of tea have you found ideal for this particular shape?

Wa Dang must be started from Chen Man-sheng (correct me if wrong).

But your pot is called Chuan Shi Wa Dang, a late-Qing/ROC commercial Yixing :D

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May 20th, '14, 12:23
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Re: Favourite Yixing teapot shape

by kyarazen » May 20th, '14, 12:23

chrl42 wrote:
bagua7 wrote:Image
Anyone using any of these? What kind of tea have you found ideal for this particular shape?

Wa Dang must be started from Chen Man-sheng (correct me if wrong).

But your pot is called Chuan Shi Wa Dang, a late-Qing/ROC commercial Yixing :D


is there any reason for it not to be called ban-wa/dang?
and also what is the difference between a "chuan-shi" version and a non "chuan-shi" version?

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May 22nd, '14, 03:32
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Joined: Mar 22nd, '08
Location: Beijing

Re: Favourite Yixing teapot shape

by chrl42 » May 22nd, '14, 03:32

kyarazen wrote:
chrl42 wrote:
bagua7 wrote:Image
Anyone using any of these? What kind of tea have you found ideal for this particular shape?

Wa Dang must be started from Chen Man-sheng (correct me if wrong).

But your pot is called Chuan Shi Wa Dang, a late-Qing/ROC commercial Yixing :D


is there any reason for it not to be called ban-wa/dang?
and also what is the difference between a "chuan-shi" version and a non "chuan-shi" version?

It's just a calling :D

calling is just to call, it doesn't 'mean' the pots.

One pot might have a few other names, like Bian Deng/Shen Deng or Li Xing/Xi Shi. Chuan Shi (傳世) has that characters inscribed. But I don't think that fashion existed during mid-Qing up to Chen Man-sheng's pots.

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