tea and food

For general/other topics related to tea.


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Feb 1st, '11, 14:44
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tea and food

by Marco » Feb 1st, '11, 14:44

Drinking tea for the enjoyment of tea itself is one thing.
But I always wondered what tea accompanies what kind of food?
What to drink with spicy food? What with sour things? What with sweets? What with fish? What to drink right after a meal?
And really what works? What accompanies well? I'd like to enjoy - otherwise I'd drink the plain water.
Any thoughts?

ciao
Marco

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Feb 1st, '11, 16:31
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Re: tea and food

by nickE » Feb 1st, '11, 16:31

I believe there's another thread on that floating around somewhere.

But anyway, I was actually thinking about this today after you mentioned it in chat. I came up with some combinations:

Shupu - greasy, fried foods. Also, gourmet cheeses.
Young sheng (bitter) - something salty, I think.
Japanese greens - definitely sweets, chocolate, etc.
Roasted tgy & yancha - strawberries, raspberries, blueberries.
Whites - melons like canteloupe & honeydew.
Blacks (malty) - breakfast foods! Scrambled eggs, bacon, potatoes...

I've tried both the Shupu combinations and liked them, but those seem to be pretty well known. Everything else is just me guessing.

It's also worth mentioning that I'd never do this with any kind of premium tea, or any tea that I want to pay specific attention to.

EDIT: found the other topic http://www.teachat.com/viewtopic.php?f=41&t=14580

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Feb 3rd, '11, 14:23
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Re: tea and food

by Marco » Feb 3rd, '11, 14:23

Thanks for your thoughts nickE.
They are more like that what I've been looking for :)

In the linked thread most of the people think "high quality tea only for the enjoyment of itself" - I can agree with that.
And then there is not much else.

But I only have time to enjoy tea at my weekend. On workdays I come home and most of the time I am hungry and want to eat something. And when I drink no tea with my meal and wait for an hour or something after it then it is too late for this caffeination.
So do the most of you think that most kind of foods are no goes with tea?

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Feb 3rd, '11, 15:38
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Re: tea and food

by AdamMY » Feb 3rd, '11, 15:38

nickE wrote:I believe there's another thread on that floating around somewhere.

But anyway, I was actually thinking about this today after you mentioned it in chat. I came up with some combinations:

Shupu - greasy, fried foods. Also, gourmet cheeses.
Young sheng (bitter) - something salty, I think.
Japanese greens - definitely sweets, chocolate, etc.
Roasted tgy & yancha - strawberries, raspberries, blueberries.
Whites - melons like canteloupe & honeydew.
Blacks (malty) - breakfast foods! Scrambled eggs, bacon, potatoes...

I've tried both the Shupu combinations and liked them, but those seem to be pretty well known. Everything else is just me guessing.

It's also worth mentioning that I'd never do this with any kind of premium tea, or any tea that I want to pay specific attention to.

EDIT: found the other topic http://www.teachat.com/viewtopic.php?f=41&t=14580
I do think Blacks and Roasted Oolongs may be able to stand up to fried foods decently also, although not that you would typically want to pair a good Roasted oolong with Fried foods.

But a rather odd combo that does not taste good together but has its uses, Japanese greens and Spicy curry dishes, it is near impossible to taste the Japanese greens when your mouth is on fire, but somehow the Japanese green seems to quench the heat a lot quicker than anything else I have yet to try.

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Mar 14th, '11, 08:49
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Re: tea and food

by chamomileteaguy » Mar 14th, '11, 08:49

The one food I require tea with is sushi and sashimi. I need a nice hot cup of jasmine tea. Either then that, I usually don't drink tea with meals, instead I always have a post lunch/dinner cup of tea (doesn't matter what kind).

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