Mixing Gong Fu infusions?

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Apr 8th 18 6:59 pm
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Mixing Gong Fu infusions?

by Rotor » Apr 8th 18 6:59 pm

Hi!
Is there anybody who mixes the separate infusions from the single gong fu session?
And the more important question for me is: Do you think that there is any difference if we brew tea in western style with the same amount of tea, water and infusion time (sum of all infusions in a single gong fu session). Theoretically the western style brewing is Gong Fu brewing without pauses between the infusions !?

My opinion is that the only factor can influence the results and to make difference is the temperature drop but it is not significant. My experiments show that in a good quality vessel the temperature drops with about 1-1.5 Celsius degree per minute.
Personally I can't find any difference between gong fu mixed infusions and western style infusion. Of course the gong fu session/s is the perfect way to make а "dissection" of the tea quality and to tune required brewing parameters.

Apr 14th 18 1:44 pm
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Re: Mixing Gong Fu infusions?

by Proinsias » Apr 14th 18 1:44 pm

I do it rather often. Doing it at the moment, had my first few brews of pu-erh in a small cup and now dumping several brews into a larger mug to wander into the garden for a bit.

It does offer some control in that if you over or under brew you can compensate with the next.

Apr 15th 18 12:02 am
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Re: Mixing Gong Fu infusions?

by WilderleafDan » Apr 15th 18 12:02 am

My experience with Western Brewing styles Vs. Gongfu style is that gong fu offers a much rich presence in the mouth. Western style just cannot create the same full mouth feel. This comes from the leaf to water ration and the density of compounds within each infusion. If you try to achieve this with western style you just end up pulling out all the bitterness and unfavourable qualities of the leaf.

So if I need to bring a thermos full of tea somewhere, I mix many gong fu infusions together to bring out the rich and balanced flavours I love without sacrificing the body and textures provided by Gongfu cha. The experience isn't as dynamic of changing, but it is a good trade off!

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Apr 15th 18 7:41 am
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Re: Mixing Gong Fu infusions?

by pedant » Apr 15th 18 7:41 am

yes, it is a common thing. a lot people call it 'stacking'.

much has been written if you want to read:
https://www.google.com/search?q=site%3A ... +infusions
Rotor wrote: And the more important question for me is: Do you think that there is any difference if we brew tea in western style with the same amount of tea, water and infusion time (sum of all infusions in a single gong fu session). Theoretically the western style brewing is Gong Fu brewing without pauses between the infusions !?
ethan is a fan of this method and wrote about it recently.

Apr 16th 18 5:45 pm
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Re: Mixing Gong Fu infusions?

by 12Tea » Apr 16th 18 5:45 pm

I do it sometimes when I'm drinking alone. I finish 2 cups of each round and accumulate the rest in a glass for later consumption. In this way I can taste as many sessions as possible and still enjoy the rest of the tea later during the day. I don't see why the comparison to Western brewing is relevant though.

Apr 18th 18 11:26 am
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Re: Mixing Gong Fu infusions?

by Rotor » Apr 18th 18 11:26 am

Thank you pedant. I didn't know the 'stacking' term. Now it will be easy to found more information.
12Tea wrote: I don't see why the comparison to Western brewing is relevant though.
Because you have the same:
- amount of tea leaves
- the same brewing time
- the same amount of water and the result tea

Far difficult is to be found differences:
- the space for the leaves (but it can be the same depends how the western style will be implemented)
- the time/temperature curve (I suppose that it will not affect the brewing process)
- the time/concentration curve (the concentration is so low that I suppose that it will not affect the brewing process)