Benefit of green tea?

Made from leaves that have not been oxidized.


Sep 16th, '16, 05:53
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Benefit of green tea?

by cateahouse » Sep 16th, '16, 05:53

What is the benefit of green tea?

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Sep 16th, '16, 09:30
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Re: Benefit of green tea?

by pedant » Sep 16th, '16, 09:30

cateahouse wrote:What is the benefit of green tea?
it tastes good.
QED

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Sep 16th, '16, 11:32
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Re: Benefit of green tea?

by jayinhk » Sep 16th, '16, 11:32

Also raises testosterone and lowers cortisol. Anxiolytic unless you overdo it and get a caffeine buzz!

Enjoy:

http://ergo-log.com/tea.html

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Sep 21st, '16, 22:01
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Re: Benefit of green tea?

by Steve@Adagio » Sep 21st, '16, 22:01

cateahouse wrote:What is the benefit of green tea?
In a nutshell, White and Green teas retain more of their natural polyphenol (antioxidant) content because they don't go through an oxidation process during manufacture. So with white and green teas you get a higher concentration of the antioxidants that people already go to tea to find. Green tea also has a high level of Catechins, another potent antioxidant, that has been linked to fighting heart disease and cancer!
And I personally have always found green tea to be very soothing to my stomach. I don't know if it's because of the antioxidants, or the minimal processing, or both. I just know it works for me :D

Here's a link to the Adagio TeaClass article on Polyphenols and Flavonoids for more information about the health benefits of tea: http://www.teaclass.com/lesson_0109.html

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Oct 7th, '16, 16:58
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Re: Benefit of green tea?

by KrisM » Oct 7th, '16, 16:58

(matcha)
intentionally raised lymphocytes from 1.7 to 2.2 K/uL in 3 months. (range 1.0-4.0)

and tastes yummy!

and so much better on my stomach/body than black tea or espresso/coffee.

Oct 8th, '16, 15:56
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Re: Benefit of green tea?

by ethan » Oct 8th, '16, 15:56

KrisM wrote:(matcha)
intentionally raised lymphocytes from 1.7 to 2.2 K/uL in 3 months. (range 1.0-4.0)

and tastes yummy!

and so much better on my stomach/body than black tea or espresso/coffee.
Hey, another Bostonian! I'll PM when I get home. Why raise lymphocytes?

Oct 8th, '16, 15:59
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Re: Benefit of green tea?

by ethan » Oct 8th, '16, 15:59

Also, I think some white tea is oxidized a bit, about as much as very green oolong. What is harvested & when seems to make it white. (Others may disagree.)

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Oct 8th, '16, 16:22
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Re: Benefit of green tea?

by entropyembrace » Oct 8th, '16, 16:22

jayinhk wrote:Also raises testosterone and lowers cortisol. Anxiolytic unless you overdo it and get a caffeine buzz!

Enjoy:

http://ergo-log.com/tea.html
Or decreases testosterone :lol:

https://www.anabolicmen.com/green-tea-testosterone/

they provide direct links to the papers they reference.

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Oct 8th, '16, 17:50
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Re: Benefit of green tea?

by KrisM » Oct 8th, '16, 17:50

ethan wrote:
KrisM wrote:(matcha)
intentionally raised lymphocytes from 1.7 to 2.2 K/uL in 3 months. (range 1.0-4.0)

and tastes yummy!

and so much better on my stomach/body than black tea or espresso/coffee.
Hey, another Bostonian! I'll PM when I get home. Why raise lymphocytes?
I have NHL low grade indolent /asymptomatic but get blood labs every 3 months at the moment so thought I'd play - Increase immune strength. Neutrophils went from 4.0 to 4.8 - both are still way below good max. It would seem that matcha is good stuff in any case. I seem to have a bunch of tsp a day and seem to feel good. I will watch these readings in the future but doubt they will rise much more.

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Oct 8th, '16, 23:06
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Re: Benefit of green tea?

by Tead Off » Oct 8th, '16, 23:06

ethan wrote:Also, I think some white tea is oxidized a bit, about as much as very green oolong. What is harvested & when seems to make it white. (Others may disagree.)
Ethan,

White tea should be the least oxidized tea, even less oxidized than green tea. Where does this definition of white tea come from? Which country or culture? And, is this definition modified according to a different country/culture, or even a different farmer?

In my way of thinking, all teas are oxidized. Some purposely and others just by being exposed to air after picking. Now, a white tea from the Himalayas tastes different than a white tea from China. Neither one are supposed to be oxidized in the sense that oolongs are oxidized. If oolongs weren't oxidized, they would not be called oolongs. The teas are named for their processing. In the Himalayas, if a tea undergoes any purposeful oxidation, it cannot be called a white tea or a green tea according to the definition of processes that we employ when we talk about teas.

Then there is the matter of subsequent oxidation after processing, how a tea is exposed when stored. This will also affect the tea's taste. In the case of white tea, we have a non-oxidized tea that can be sold right away or kept for storage. We would still call that stored tea, white tea, and it would keep its characteristics and mature other flavors into it over time. This is a very desirable tea in Chinese culture and sought after. I have some 6 year old Darjeeling white tea that is delicious.

In regards to the white tea you mention above, can it really be called a white tea if it is purposefully oxidized like a green oolong?. Of course, the name doesn't really matter. A rose is a rose, etc. But for the sake of the buyer, who is the ultimate consumer of this tea, full disclosure should be made if it is known by the seller. Don't you agree?

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Oct 9th, '16, 01:20
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Re: Benefit of green tea?

by jayinhk » Oct 9th, '16, 01:20

entropyembrace wrote:
jayinhk wrote:Also raises testosterone and lowers cortisol. Anxiolytic unless you overdo it and get a caffeine buzz!

Enjoy:

http://ergo-log.com/tea.html
Or decreases testosterone :lol:

https://www.anabolicmen.com/green-tea-testosterone/

they provide direct links to the papers they reference.
Damn you EE! Lol. Well I know I feel great after drinking green tea. I've used testosterone recreationally and I get a similar rush of wellbeing. Anecdotal of course but I'll keep drinking green tea...in moderation :) thanks for the link!

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Re: Benefit of green tea?

by ethan » Oct 9th, '16, 06:57

teadoff, My original feeling about white tea is it is the simplest. The least is done to it or happens to it naturally; however, I have had enough now to feel there is some oxidation. I don't know of any that is oxidized on purpose & agree w/ you; if it were, it should be disclosed. It would make one wonder what is meant by "white".
However, w/ white tea often I've felt oxidation; &, w/o much thought wrote that is about = to very green oolong. I expect the comment comes myduring travel w/ white tea in very humid places, I feel some characteristics of green oolong. Sometimes I cannot remember exactly what the white tea I have from Nepal was like at first. It might give me a feeling of oolong; other times it might rival Nepali black tea in its effect on me. I suppose this is also from traveling & preparing tea badly in the lobby of my hostel etc. (I still enjoy the tea a lot even when it's not always hitting me as especially white: delicate etc.)
What you wrote is much more accurate & brings no argument against it from me.
The Oriental Beauty oolong from Thailand that I have now sometimes seems like white tea (in its flavors) than many white teas might. I suppose definitions & terms should be based on oxidation levels & along the the lines you wrote than the more subjective--how it hits one.

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Oct 9th, '16, 07:53
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Re: Benefit of green tea?

by Tead Off » Oct 9th, '16, 07:53

ethan wrote:teadoff, My original feeling about white tea is it is the simplest. The least is done to it or happens to it naturally; however, I have had enough now to feel there is some oxidation. I don't know of any that is oxidized on purpose & agree w/ you; if it were, it should be disclosed. It would make one wonder what is meant by "white".
However, w/ white tea often I've felt oxidation; &, w/o much thought wrote that is about = to very green oolong. I expect the comment comes myduring travel w/ white tea in very humid places, I feel some characteristics of green oolong. Sometimes I cannot remember exactly what the white tea I have from Nepal was like at first. It might give me a feeling of oolong; other times it might rival Nepali black tea in its effect on me. I suppose this is also from traveling & preparing tea badly in the lobby of my hostel etc. (I still enjoy the tea a lot even when it's not always hitting me as especially white: delicate etc.)
What you wrote is much more accurate & brings no argument against it from me.
The Oriental Beauty oolong from Thailand that I have now sometimes seems like white tea (in its flavors) than many white teas might. I suppose definitions & terms should be based on oxidation levels & along the the lines you wrote than the more subjective--how it hits one.
Maybe judging teas by their flavor is not really an accurate way to categorize them. Flavor doesn't determine the color of the tea. Probably, the Chinese used a color system first to classify teas, white being the least oxidized and Red being the most. Black is a different classification in the Chinese system than the western. Hei cha is not Darjeeling or Japanese/Taiwanese black teas.

Many Chinese classify lightly oxidized oolong like gaoshan teas as green. I can see them fitting more in with the green than let's say Wuyi teas or TGY. I've yet to hear a clear classification of balhyocha even from the Koreans. But, I don't really mind what people call green or oolong as long as they are buying what they like to drink and not just a name.

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Oct 9th, '16, 10:20
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Re: Benefit of green tea?

by KrisM » Oct 9th, '16, 10:20

but judging tea by flavor is yummy! :D and doesn't tea oxidize once you've opened it? so even though it may not have been oxidized in preparation, it would be very hard to have a tea that hasn't experiences some oxidation. Though for me that oxidation just means it doesn't taste as good as when I first opened it so will buy smaller amounts... Still yummy... and matcha does not have the extreme prep oxidation that black (India)teas generally have, as I understand it. I'll have to get some old white and try it... edit seems like less oxidation would be a good thing nutrient-wise...

that led me to 2 things
http://www.tching.com/2014/07/three-yea ... white-tea/

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Old-Tree-White- ... SwdsFXS59j

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Oct 13th, '16, 14:45
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Re: Benefit of green tea?

by Steve@Adagio » Oct 13th, '16, 14:45

KrisM wrote:doesn't tea oxidize once you've opened it?
Technically yes, Kris. But the oxidation that occurs with tea processing is controlled oxidation. It involves raised temperatures [applying heat]. The type of oxidation your tea experiences once you open it is passive. This is also why you should ideally store your tea in air-tight containers.

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