Situation of Green tea in each country.

Made from leaves that have not been oxidized.


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May 4th, '17, 01:04
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Re: Situation of Green tea in each country.

by NateHevens » May 4th, '17, 01:04

Man it's been a long time since I posted here. All these new changes!

Also... Yawatayachaho, your English is fine. No need to apologize for it.
Yawatayachaho wrote:1) Which country do you live?
New York, United States
2) Which is common in your country Green tea made in Japan or made in China?
Honestly, like others have said, I think it doesn't matter. Very cheap Chinese green tea (like Gunpowder and the like) is probably more popular only because of cheap tea bags.

Regardless, like others have mentioned, I'd be surprised if most US-Americans could even distinguish the differences between green teas from different countries and regions, so...
3) What kind of image for Green tea & Matcha does your nation people have? (healthy, too bitter to drink…something like this)
I think more people drink green tea because of supposed health benefits (full disclosure: I'm a skeptic and a science nerd; as a result, I'm personally skeptical of tea's health benefits... not closed off, mind you... I just think that more scientific testing is needed before making definitive conclusions) than taste. People often find green tea to be bitter.

I'm convinced that this is largely because most people here don't actually know the proper ways of brewing green tea (like proper water temperatures and stuff), all thanks to things like Lipton tea bags and such, which encourage over-steeping in too-hot water and bag-squeezing.
4) Which is famous in your country pure Green tea or Flavor tea? - What kind of flavor does your nation people prefer?
Flavored, definitely. Anyone here who might remember me from when I posted slightly more often knows that I work as a team member for Teavana. We sell way more flavored teas than pure teas.

As for what kind of flavor... fruit flavors seem to be the most popular. So, teas with added dried fruits and such. Teavana also has some success with so-called "dessert" flavors, which are largely herbal tisanes that based around rooibos and include things like chocolate pieces, peppermint, marigold, vanilla pieces, caramel pieces, etc.

Another popular style is something called "Southern-Style Sweet Tea". See that link for how I make it with loose-leaf black tea.
5) How much the market price for Green tea & Matcha per 100g.
I'm just going to co-sign joelbct's answer to this one...
6) Why do you interested in Green tea?
The taste. Admittedly, I am extremely sensitive towards bitter flavors, and as a result do not like bitter at all. This is why I don't drink beer (for the most part). However, in learning how to brew green teas properly, and favoring lower water temperatures, I have found green tea to be a world of amazing flavors.

My favorite is definitely a good Gyokuro, followed by Matcha as well as Tencha. But I also enjoy a good Dragonwell very much, and have discovered green tea from Jeju Island that is wonderful.
7) What kind of situation when you drink Green tea?
Currently, because it's summer, I'm cold-brewing my teas. I cold-brew in pitchers so I can then take the tea on the go. If I'm at home, I'll drink said cold-brewed tea from a glass.

In the winter, I usually drink my hot teas at home, as I much prefer to use brewing styles specific to each kind of tea.

I very rarely travel into New York city to visit tea lounges, with my favorite spot being a place called Tea Drunk, although I enjoy other spots, as well.

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May 20th, '17, 02:02
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Re: Situation of Green tea in each country.

by Yawatayachaho » May 20th, '17, 02:02

Dear NateHevens san.

Deeply sorry for my late reply.
Thanks a lot for your kind reply with easy to understand explanation.

As you and others said , The pure green tea is little bit difficult to be preferred because of its "Bitterness" . Therefore, Flavor one is better. Your information about Teavana is really precious for me. They took very good way to preferred tea by nation people. fruits flavor...It's very interesting! If have opportunity to drink it, I'd love to try it.

I'm very glad to hear that you like Gyokuro.
Have you ever tried Ice-brewed-tea? If you've never, I recommend try it once.
Caffeine which is components for bitterness and Catechin which is components for Astringency are not exude in low temperature water. If you blew tea by Ice, it's gong to be really sweet and fresh taste.

Thank you...

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May 20th, '17, 16:03
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Re: Situation of Green tea in each country.

by victoria3 » May 20th, '17, 16:03

Yes, Gyokuro steeped over ice is delicious, very rich and sweet.

Jun 11th, '17, 01:49
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Re: Situation of Green tea in each country.

by devites » Jun 11th, '17, 01:49

Hi!

1) Which country do you live?
I live in the US (Seattle) / and just moved back from Spain where I was living for 2 years so I can comment on both.

2) Which is common in your country Green tea made in Japan or made in China?
In Seattle, Japanese green tea is getting popular. People are generally not savvy enough to purchase loose leaf Japanese green tea online from a great vendor like O-cha, but people do like to drink Japanese green tea at local coffee shops and coffee shops are everywhere now. Chinese green tea is mostly available at restaurants and is low quality and free.

In Spain, Green tea is mostly Chinese and low quality, but I was able to get some Japanese green tea like genmaicha, hojicha, and sencha as well as matcha lattes in loose leaf tea shops.

3) What kind of image for Green tea & Matcha does your nation people have? (healthy, too bitter to drink…something like this)
Green tea/matcha in both US and Spain has an image of health conscious individuals that do yoga. Matcha is used in different desserts at healthy organic restaurants.

When i have ordered matcha it is generally too bitter, but as a matcha latte, which you can get almost anywhere nowadays it is much more fitting to the western sugar hungry and milk saturated palette

4) Which is famous in your country pure Green tea or Flavor tea? - What kind of flavor does your nation people prefer?
Flavor tea is definitely preferred in Spain.
In Seattle, green tea served at high end restaurants or coffee shops is generally pure green tea, but at Starbucks flavor tea is common.

5) How much the market price for Green tea & Matcha per 100g.
Green tea is around 15 dollars to 20 dollars for good stuff, and maybe 8 dollars to 12 dollars for average quality at the Asian supermarket. If you are looking to enter a market look up Uwajimaya. They are a local Asian grocery store, but they are huge and have a decent tea selection.

I have not bought Matcha in awhile, but from what i remember it is quite expensive.

6) Why do you interested in Green tea?
I love Japanese green tea from when I was 14. That was 10 years ago. I was really interested in Japanese culture, movies, food, and tea was a big part of this interest.

7) What kind of situation when you drink Green tea?]
I like to drink green tea to help with work, I am a gardener and my job has many repetitive zen like tasks, and I find green tea is a better alternative to coffee, because it gives me energy, but I am relaxed and thinking positive thoughts.

I also like to drink green tea at home to savour all the great flavours of sencha!

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Jul 6th, '17, 01:53
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Re: Situation of Green tea in each country.

by NateHevens » Jul 6th, '17, 01:53

Yawatayachaho wrote: Dear NateHevens san.

Deeply sorry for my late reply.
Ha! Now it's my turn to apologize for a late response! :mrgreen:
Thanks a lot for your kind reply with easy to understand explanation.

As you and others said , The pure green tea is little bit difficult to be preferred because of its "Bitterness" . Therefore, Flavor one is better. Your information about Teavana is really precious for me. They took very good way to preferred tea by nation people. fruits flavor...It's very interesting! If have opportunity to drink it, I'd love to try it.
The thing about flavored teas is this... most are not good unsweetened when brewed hot. Some are. I've also actually found that many of Teavana's flavored teas and herbal/fruit tisanes are pretty delicious cold-brewed without sugar. Their dessert tisanes, however, cannot be cold-brewed at all.

Further, many fruit teas are engineered to be iced teas. Obviously, they can be brewed as hot teas, but they are made to taste better when brewed concentrated (that is, quite a bit of tea in comparison to water... we use 0.5 cup of tea per 16 fluid ounces [473.18 mL] of hot water for iced tea) then poured over ice.
I'm very glad to hear that you like Gyokuro.
Have you ever tried Ice-brewed-tea? If you've never, I recommend try it once.
Caffeine which is components for bitterness and Catechin which is components for Astringency are not exude in low temperature water. If you blew tea by Ice, it's gong to be really sweet and fresh taste.
I tried ice-brewing once, but I'm quite positive that I did it wrong because it was way too strong. I think I could use some directions/guidance for this one.

As mentioned in my previous post, I do cold-brew in the summers, however. And I make pitchers I fill a 66 fluid ounce [1951.85 mL] pitcher with cold, filtered water, put around 8 to 12 grams of leaves into a basket, lower the basket into the pitcher, and leave it in the fridge for 8 hours for most pure greens, whites, and oolongs (I haven't cold-brewed a black/red tea or pu-erh, yet, though I'd like to), 12 hours for most flavored teas and mint-based tisanes, and indefinitely for flavored tisanes and chamomile.

I've also cold-brewed with seltzer water, but I need to figure out how to stop losing so much carbonation (my pitcher closes very tightly, yet the carbonation gas still escapes to the point that the brew is largely flat when it's done steeping). I may just get a sodastream in the future to recarbonate the brew after it's done steeping.

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