What Shincha Should I Order from Den's?

Made from leaves that have not been oxidized.


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May 15th, '08, 11:28
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What Shincha Should I Order from Den's?

by TimeforTea » May 15th, '08, 11:28

I'd like to place an order from Den's but am still too new to tea to decide what to get. Any suggestions as to how to decide?

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May 15th, '08, 12:14
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by chamekke » May 15th, '08, 12:14

I'm still awaiting my first order from Den's, so I can't recommend specific teas from personal experience yet. BUT...

If you're placing your first order, do get the "Green Tea Kit" (sampler):
http://www.denstea.com/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=174_173

It's only available to first-time customers - and it's a real deal!

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May 15th, '08, 12:17
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Re: What Shincha Should I Order from Den's?

by olivierco » May 15th, '08, 12:17

Teasweetie wrote:I'd like to place an order from Den's but am still too new to tea to decide what to get. Any suggestions as to how to decide?


If you want specifically a shincha, I guess the Kunpu (light steamed) is a good start. Light steamed sencha or shincha are easier to brew.
But I haven't tasted it.

May 15th, '08, 13:03
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by Pentox » May 15th, '08, 13:03

I ordered all 3!

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May 15th, '08, 14:10
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by bambooforest » May 15th, '08, 14:10

The Kunpu is *very* mild -- and demands a lot of leaf to get a nice tasting cup. I actually find that Fukamushi-cha is easier to brew.

I only had two sessions of the kunpu - but it seems pretty darn good.

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May 15th, '08, 14:24
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by Chip » May 15th, '08, 14:24

I have never been disappointed by their mid to high range sencha and fukamushi. Their guricha is quite good as well.

They are a good vendor, but since all their teas are from Shizuoka I need to go beyond them for variety.

They do not nitro flush which is a slight down side for me. Smaller bags are a plus.

My current trio of Japanese based vendors are O-Cha, Hibiki, and Den's. They are all very good.

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May 15th, '08, 15:15
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by bambooforest » May 15th, '08, 15:15

I think it's particularly wonderful that Den's sells in 56 gram bags. It's a nice change of pace. And, even though they don't nitro flush, there is an oxygen absorber in the bag which is suppose to be very effective.

If I have a bag of Den's in the fridge unopened, I think it would stay fresh for a long time to come.

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May 15th, '08, 15:39
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by olivierco » May 15th, '08, 15:39

bambooforest wrote:The Kunpu is *very* mild -- and demands a lot of leaf to get a nice tasting cup. I actually find that Fukamushi-cha is easier to brew.


That is precisely the reason why I find light steamed sencha easier to brew: quantity of leaves isn't critical (as long as you use enough of them and I sure use much (too much?) leaves) and as long as you watch temperature, you won't get any bitterness.

Perhaps my opinion comes from my sencha debuts when I struggled a little to obtain good results with deep steamed sencha.

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May 15th, '08, 15:45
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by Chip » May 15th, '08, 15:45

olivierco wrote:
bambooforest wrote:The Kunpu is *very* mild -- and demands a lot of leaf to get a nice tasting cup. I actually find that Fukamushi-cha is easier to brew.


That is precisely the reason why I find light steamed sencha easier to brew: quantity of leaves isn't critical (as long as you use enough of them and I sure use much (too much?) leaves) and as long as you watch temperature, you won't get any bitterness.

Perhaps my opinion comes from my sencha debuts when I struggled a little to obtain good results with deep steamed sencha.


I tend to follow Olivier's thinking...asamushicha is easier for me to brew often times since I can use varying amounts of leaf and get a nice session out of it.

Fukamushicha can be less forgiving, but when it is good, it is sooo good.

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May 15th, '08, 16:33
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by bambooforest » May 15th, '08, 16:33

Both Olivierco and Chip make a valid point. Indeed, if you use too much fuka it can make a sub par pot of tea. I think too much light steamed can too, but not to the same extent.

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May 15th, '08, 23:23
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by TimeforTea » May 15th, '08, 23:23

Thanks for all the tips! :D

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May 15th, '08, 23:23
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by greenisgood » May 15th, '08, 23:23

I agree with bambooforest on the freshness of Den's, I've had a few bags of Maki in the fridge for a while now and recently got one out after a few months and it was still very fresh tasting. I haven't had the O-Cha Supreme but Maki is darn good fuka.

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