Kyarazen on Tea/Incense.

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Nov 3rd, '14, 15:00
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Re: Kyarazen on Tea/Incense.

by BW85 » Nov 3rd, '14, 15:00

William wrote:Thank you for the shared informations, Kyarazen!

So, if I understood, in your opinion, Gushu material processed with traditional methods, regardless of the quality, it should be formerly bitter and unpalatable?
This too caught my attention. It seems to be a commonly held belief that quality ancient tree material will lack the bitterness and astringency of younger trees/terraced bushes. Perhaps this belief came about because this newer modern processing method started around the same time people started pressing pure gushu cakes... And a correlation was inaccurately made?
Can we really talk of right and wrong processing method? I mean, if it is now carried a processing method that transform something formerly bitter into something sugary/raisiny/fruity etc. etc., can we really talk of right and wrong, since no one can say how this tea will age over the next 30/50 years?.
The times they are a changing'
Let's hope these new teas age well. Maybe they'll require sealed storage as I think kyarazen mentioned

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Nov 3rd, '14, 21:25
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Re: Kyarazen on Tea/Incense.

by kyarazen » Nov 3rd, '14, 21:25

yup! generally bitter, but that varies with the season. polyphenols, antioxidants are never sweet, if you have access to a purification facility or extraction facility, you can purify some to find it vile and bitter. managing the concentration of it through processing, i.e. photo-oxidation by sunning, thermal breakdown by baking, blending in of autumn leaves, picking leaves that are super early into spring, will give you a product drinkable at this moment.

its hard to talk about right or wrong processing method because there are are changes in the consumer market, tea goes with current market demands (not future), everyone is out to make $$. what the market currently wants, the farmers and merchants make!

thanks to many friends abroad that had sent me a myriad of teas from various merchants and sources in their respective countries, based on the lignification, venation, leaf texture, it started being apparent that many of these teas are blended with well processed autumn teas that gives the comfortable mouth feel, low bitterness, sweetish texture, which is more drinkable and more well appreciated by many, at the expense of the bold bitter, umami of the spring teas etc.

there's absolutely nothing wrong with drinking autumn tea, although I'm more concerned about oxalate and fluoride content which theoretically can be less good for health, but we'll have to see in the long run. for sure I will not be drinking tibetan black compressed tea without milk, the oxalate content is something you have to be careful to prevent kidney stones from developing. its a topic not commonly talked about since the propaganda in the mainland keeps going on about the magic of gushu, 天公造物,health benefits of tea etc.

is lignification all bad? I dont think so. considering the analysis of how tea bricks (often made of twiggy and rough fibrous leaves that are well lignified) had aged, together with the necessity of "anaerobic" and confined environments for lignin break down to give the "aged woody" taste, it may not be a bad thing for aging. there are so many "rags" to "royalty" type of teas these days, cakes bricks that were in the dollar range in the early days, bitter, vile, horrid, and now many are treasured after they had aged.






William wrote:Thank you for the shared informations, Kyarazen!

So, if I understood, in your opinion, Gushu material processed with traditional methods, regardless of the quality, it should be formerly bitter and unpalatable?

Another question comes to mind.
Can we really talk of right and wrong processing method? I mean, if it is now carried a processing method that transform something formerly bitter into something sugary/raisiny/fruity etc. etc., can we really talk of right and wrong, since no one can say how this tea will age over the next 30/50 years?

Surely you have adopted, in my opinion, the correct classification (traditional methods/modern methods), without falling into the the classical ideology that if something is not done in the traditional way then it is definitely wrong.

Regards.

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Nov 3rd, '14, 22:00
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Re: Kyarazen on Tea/Incense.

by kyarazen » Nov 3rd, '14, 22:00

BW85 wrote: This too caught my attention. It seems to be a commonly held belief that quality ancient tree material will lack the bitterness and astringency of younger trees/terraced bushes. Perhaps this belief came about because this newer modern processing method started around the same time people started pressing pure gushu cakes... And a correlation was inaccurately made?

The times they are a changing'
Let's hope these new teas age well. Maybe they'll require sealed storage as I think kyarazen mentioned
younger/terraced bushes can be processed to be mild on the bitterness nowadays too with new methods. they are blended into gushu material for a better selling price.


the bitterness and astrigency of tea is correlated to sunlight exposure. with the intensification of sunlight, the tea leaves increase in bitter polyphenol and antioxidant content to prevent damage, we cannot escape from the chemistry of this. being a big tea tree, the gushu definitely needs quite a big amount of sunlight for photosynthesis for its own survival.

how abundant is proper gushu material/ancient tree tea then? its probably much lesser that what people might imagine to be. where are then the "gushu" raw material coming from for mimicry? leaves from other seasons, plantation leaves that are larger, Guan-Mu type of domesticated tea plants, xiao qiao mu type of domesticated tea plants, etc etc.

storage wise, i probably have said enough on the forum to ruffle feathers. despite my current opinions, i'm still researching and discussing.

i had met a chinese gold trader at an agarwood shop whom asked me what tea i drink and what type of pots i use, to which i replied i drink average tea in lousy crude/rough tea ware. he only uses ming-jia pots and drinks pu-erh from bingdao, laobanzhang single tree harvests, wealthy enough to have access to customized pressings. wanted to give me a 200g cake and left me a phone number to arrange with him but I had decided against it as I couldnt tell his agenda, apart from wanting fragrant wood knowledge.

he compares the enjoyment of his spring custom pressings to that of enjoying aged gaoliang wine, aged tiger bone wines etc, the clarity of the bitterness without turning astrigent, the savoury taste, that leads on to a sweetish throat mouth feel. to him, that characteristic disappeared within a year of open storage, to which i asked him, without these characteristics, is the tea still worth 10K rmb per jin? suggested to him to try sealed storage to see if he can preserve the desired characteristics for longer.

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Nov 4th, '14, 11:59
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Re: Kyarazen on Tea/Incense.

by kyarazen » Nov 4th, '14, 11:59

having a breather from a few busy weeks of work so I'm in a writing mood again. So here's another crappy write up of mine on Tea tasting with about 20 tips for your consideration

these tips were put together from literature of several chinese/taiwanese authors, encounters with various tea lovers, masters, and many more.

http://www.kyarazen.com/philosophy-chado-tasting/

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Nov 4th, '14, 14:41
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Re: Kyarazen on Tea/Incense.

by William » Nov 4th, '14, 14:41

Amazing articles, Kyarazen! Surely, food for thought.
Thanks for sharing. :)

Nov 4th, '14, 16:10
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Re: Kyarazen on Tea/Incense.

by drinking_teas » Nov 4th, '14, 16:10

kyarazen wrote:having a breather from a few busy weeks of work so I'm in a writing mood again. So here's another crappy write up of mine on Tea tasting with about 20 tips for your consideration

these tips were put together from literature of several chinese/taiwanese authors, encounters with various tea lovers, masters, and many more.

http://www.kyarazen.com/philosophy-chado-tasting/
fantastic. keep writing, your articles on tea/teaware are great, and your incense articles are interesting as well (although I don't know anything about incense).

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Nov 7th, '14, 13:43
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Re: Kyarazen on Tea/Incense.

by kyarazen » Nov 7th, '14, 13:43

3 short write ups on 3 tea brewing methods

Yixing / Taiwanese Brewing method (usually used for low oxidation, taiwanese rolled oolongs, and other low oxidation teas)
http://www.kyarazen.com/yixing-taiwanes ... ethod-tea/

Anxi Brewing Method (usually more for rolled TKY, some times yancha)
http://www.kyarazen.com/anxi-brewing-method-tea/

Shao An Brewing Method (usually used for high oxidation heavy roasted teas)
http://www.kyarazen.com/shao-brewing-method-tea/


chaozhou brewing method to be uploaded soon.. this is the most difficult and complicated to write.

do take note that these are very traditional methods, its not necessary to follow them strictly, substituting or removing steps is perfectly fine, because no one is going to kill you for that. 8) :lol:

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Nov 7th, '14, 16:33
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Re: Kyarazen on Tea/Incense.

by William » Nov 7th, '14, 16:33

As always, these articles are a pleasure to be read. :wink:
Hope to read the Chaozhou's article soon!

Regards.

Nov 7th, '14, 22:28
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Re: Kyarazen on Tea/Incense.

by ole » Nov 7th, '14, 22:28

I stumbled across your blog a few months ago when looking for jinkō info, I've been a regular reader ever since. Just wanted to say thank you for some great content! (both when it comes to incense and tea)

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Nov 8th, '14, 14:24
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Re: Kyarazen on Tea/Incense.

by kyarazen » Nov 8th, '14, 14:24

William wrote:As always, these articles are a pleasure to be read. :wink:
Hope to read the Chaozhou's article soon!

Regards.
thanks for appreciating :)

the Chaozhou article is up now at
http://www.kyarazen.com/chaozhou-gongfu ... ethod-tea/

which i'll continue to refine over the next few days. there's much more to CZ style, but the post should be sufficient for now

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Nov 8th, '14, 14:26
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Re: Kyarazen on Tea/Incense.

by kyarazen » Nov 8th, '14, 14:26

ole wrote:I stumbled across your blog a few months ago when looking for jinkō info, I've been a regular reader ever since. Just wanted to say thank you for some great content! (both when it comes to incense and tea)
you are very welcome :)

information and education is priceless. as long as the reader gains some wisdom, develop new understandings etc, i believe my crappy writings would have served their purpose.

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Nov 8th, '14, 15:05
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Re: Kyarazen on Tea/Incense.

by William » Nov 8th, '14, 15:05

Interesting article, Kyarazen! I will try these various brewing methods during the next weeks, especially CZ's brewing method.
Thanks for sharing! :)

Nov 30th, '14, 19:34
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Re: Kyarazen on Tea/Incense.

by alix » Nov 30th, '14, 19:34


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Dec 2nd, '14, 23:01
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Re: Kyarazen on Tea/Incense.

by chamekke » Dec 2nd, '14, 23:01

kyarazen, this is a bit off-topic for this post, but I'm an incense enthusiast (along with tea) so I'm very glad you mentioned that aspect of your blog too!

Just read your post on burning incense powders as trails without makko and now I'm itching to give it a try. Can't wait to read the rest of your blog.

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Dec 2nd, '14, 23:49
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Re: Kyarazen on Tea/Incense.

by kyarazen » Dec 2nd, '14, 23:49

chamekke wrote:kyarazen, this is a bit off-topic for this post, but I'm an incense enthusiast (along with tea) so I'm very glad you mentioned that aspect of your blog too!

Just read your post on burning incense powders as trails without makko and now I'm itching to give it a try. Can't wait to read the rest of your blog.
thanks for appreciating the posts.

if you dont have a stencil yet you can consider doing it without one
http://www.kyarazen.com/incense-trails-without-stencil/


feel free to discuss on incense too, its appreciation, blending etc etc
would love to share discuss and learn from each other

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