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Oct 9th, '09, 17:38
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Re: Tetsubin , new vs. old ?

by tenuki » Oct 9th, '09, 17:38

Image on the other side... 'strong/power' ?


That's why I got it - the hippy tetsubin... 'flower power'!! ;)

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Oct 9th, '09, 17:45
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Re: Tetsubin , new vs. old ?

by JBaymore » Oct 9th, '09, 17:45

chamekke wrote:IMore examples here:
http://www.otomiya.com/kamon/plant/tachibana.htm
Nice link....... thanks.

best,

..........john

Oct 9th, '09, 18:45
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Re: Tetsubin , new vs. old ?

by Intuit » Oct 9th, '09, 18:45

Iron oxide deposits can be dual-natured. The iron is oxidized, but it can 'give away' electrons to oxidize other molecules (like bitter components), and therefore return to a reduced state. That's the way they function in cells, too.

Salt deposits are just that. They can be partially removed if they can be hydrated - the point of 'boiling' with low mineral water.

When our Swiss Ginkgo reports that her alpine lake water used for tea tastes 'sweeter' after boiling in her cast iron kettle, it's probably because the kettle adds just a touch of iron. Elsewhere here on TC, I've provided a detailed explanation of the 'u-shaped' concentration vs aesthetic quality of dissolved iron in water. Too little or too much can negatively affect flavor.

That is why I recommend using one of these pots only if your public supply or bottled water is very soft and you drink a lot of teas that don't brew well in moderately mineralized water.

The Japanese condition new kettles by heating water daily for several weeks, to encourage protective mineral deposits that limit oxygen access to the surface, but also induce a small amount of iron oxidation for 'sweetening' purposes.

If you want an older kettle because of it's aesthetic appearance, great. Buy it if it appeals to you. Do not buy it because you think it's deteriorated interior condition is special. A new one will degrade relatively quickly to afford the 'sweetening' qualities - if you really need it - in a matter of months.

The differential cost between the two may be negated if you are lucky and find your 'antique' in good condition from a location where shipping costs are a fraction of overseas postage, due to to the weight of these kettles.

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Oct 9th, '09, 23:36
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Re: Tetsubin , new vs. old ?

by Tead Off » Oct 9th, '09, 23:36

tenuki wrote:
Tead Off wrote: How do you deal with the rust and scale issues of the antique ones?
Deal? That is the good stuff man.. :D
I ask this question because according to the Hojo God, the scale build up can actually act against the new water introduced into the kettle because the scale is from a different water source. I have no way of knowing if this is true or not, so I am asking if this has been an issue for users or not.

If a tetsubin has rust, do you simply boil over that rust and continue to use, or, do you try and clear it as rust is a corrosive process.

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Oct 12th, '09, 04:59
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Re: Tetsubin , new vs. old ?

by ginkgo » Oct 12th, '09, 04:59

I suppress this message ...
Last edited by ginkgo on Oct 16th, '09, 15:42, edited 2 times in total.

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Oct 12th, '09, 09:00
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Re: Tetsubin , new vs. old ?

by Tead Off » Oct 12th, '09, 09:00

Gingko,

Thanks for posting this.

Why don't you try to sell some of your work through the artist site on this board? I don't see any link to your work for pieces for sale. Did I miss it?

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Oct 12th, '09, 09:24
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Re: Tetsubin , new vs. old ?

by Chip » Oct 12th, '09, 09:24

Tead Off wrote:Gingko,

Thanks for posting this.

Why don't you try to sell some of your work through the artist site on this board? I don't see any link to your work for pieces for sale. Did I miss it?
http://www.teachat.com/viewtopic.php?f=40&t=10768
.

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Oct 16th, '09, 10:49
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Re: Tetsubin , new vs. old ?

by ginkgo » Oct 16th, '09, 10:49

How can i suppress my message ? ok I find th way...
Last edited by ginkgo on Oct 16th, '09, 15:43, edited 1 time in total.

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Oct 16th, '09, 10:54
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Re: Tetsubin , new vs. old ?

by olivierco » Oct 16th, '09, 10:54

ginkgo wrote:How can i suppress my message ? Nadacha ask to delete it and i don't find haow ! thanks a lot !!!
You are not able to suppress it but you can edit it.

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Nov 16th, '09, 08:06
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Re: Tetsubin , new vs. old ?

by nicolas » Nov 16th, '09, 08:06

Oni wrote:But the only place I have seen antique tetsubin was nadacha.co.uk, the tetsubins are expenceive but I have no other shop to compare the prices.
Try these:

Guyihui
Beijing, China
http://shop36577624.taobao.com/

ImageImageImage

Tangren Tea House
Guangzhou, China
http://shop36202542.taobao.com/?catId=5 ... y&search=y

ImageImage

Qingyun Tea Garden
Shenzhen, China
http://www.teaqy.com/

ImageImageImage

Nanbu Tetsubin
Tokyo, Japan
http://www.nanbu-tetsubin.com/shop/tkxc ... yID=000001

Image

Gekkan Bijutsu
Tokyo, Japan
http://www.gekkanbijutsu.co.jp/shop/22017001.htm

Image

Btw, the Tokyo stores above sell Suzuki Morihisa tetsubins for lower prices than Hojo tea - http://hojotea.com/img/tetsubinlineup.pdf :wink:
Last edited by nicolas on Dec 26th, '09, 00:53, edited 1 time in total.

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Nov 16th, '09, 11:20
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Re: Tetsubin , new vs. old ?

by Tead Off » Nov 16th, '09, 11:20

good links, nicolas. Thanks.

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Dec 26th, '09, 00:46
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Re: Tetsubin , new vs. old ?

by nicolas » Dec 26th, '09, 00:46

Here's more.

御釜屋
http://www.nanbutetsubin.com/

鈴木盛久工房
http://www.suzukimorihisa.com/

鈴木主善堂
http://www.shuzendo.com/

藤枝工房
http://www.tetubinn.com/

南部鉄庵
http://tetsuan.jp/

虎山工房
http://www.kozan.info/

照光堂 照亦製作所
http://www.ginga.or.jp/~morihand/koubou/terumata

岩鋳販売(株)岩鋳鋳造所
http://www.iwachu.co.jp/

Hibachiya
http://www.hibachiya.com/do/nanbu/

烟波致爽阁
http://www.62585578.com/categories/144

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Dec 26th, '09, 01:18
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Re: Tetsubin , new vs. old ?

by MarshalN » Dec 26th, '09, 01:18

The Chinese sites are grossly overpriced

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Dec 26th, '09, 02:41
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Re: Tetsubin , new vs. old ?

by edkrueger » Dec 26th, '09, 02:41

MarshalN wrote:Oni, I must strongly disagree with your statement here. Every single one of my antique tetsubins are under $200, and I can guarantee you they do something to my water. I've done blind taste test with people who have no idea what to expect and the answer is the same.

Price is NOT a good indicator of quality. Just because something is $500 does not mean it's authentic. With antiques, if you know where to look, how to look, and what to look for, you can find relatively cheap things for a great bargain.

The vendors you've linked to all charge at least 200% margin on their wares. Just because you don't have a way to find them for Japanese local prices doesn't mean anything cheaper is definitely fake or bad.

Once again, high price is not a reliable indicator of quality. It will serve you well to remember that.
I have to agree with Marshal here. I have a couple of cheap Tetsubin. 1 marked "Made in Japan" dating it post 1952. Another from a antiques dealer from, which they estimated was 50s plus. Both make good water for tea. One thing, however, AN does not sell too much over "Japanese price" I've seen some of the pieces he sells for a bit less than he does and a bit more than he does.

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