Oct 26th, '14, 20:12
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aluminium tetsubin

by jjanek » Oct 26th, '14, 20:12

Hi everybody
I´m looking for information about tetsubins made of aluminium - I´ve read they were made during WWII, but tetsubin on pictures is claimed to be about 100 years old (photos are from e-shop). Does anybody know something about them? And is aluminium any good for boiling water? The one on the pictures is not expensive and looks quite good....
Thanks a lot
Honza
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Oct 27th, '14, 05:43
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Re: aluminium tetsubin

by theredbaron » Oct 27th, '14, 05:43

Aluminium is definitely not the best choice for boiling water for tea.

Oct 27th, '14, 17:58
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Re: aluminium tetsubin

by jjanek » Oct 27th, '14, 17:58

Thanks for reply, but one question.. why? Where is the problem with aluminium and what does this metal do with the quality of water?

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Oct 27th, '14, 18:10
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Re: aluminium tetsubin

by William » Oct 27th, '14, 18:10

jjanek wrote:Thanks for reply, but one question.. why? Where is the problem with aluminium and what does this metal do with the quality of water?
I think the main problem is the affinity of water with metals. Usually, water boiled with aluminium and copper is not suitable for brewing tea, because it will bring to a worse outcome than water boiled with neutral materials.
Generally, neutral materials are glass, tin and silver.
In my opinion, the only material that bring noticeable effects to the water is the cast iron, typically represented by Japanese tetsubin.

Regards.

Oct 27th, '14, 19:29
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Re: aluminium tetsubin

by bonescwa » Oct 27th, '14, 19:29

William wrote:
jjanek wrote:Thanks for reply, but one question.. why? Where is the problem with aluminium and what does this metal do with the quality of water?
I think the main problem is the affinity of water with metals. Usually, water boiled with aluminium and copper is not suitable for brewing tea, because it will bring to a worse outcome than water boiled with neutral materials.
Generally, neutral materials are glass, tin and silver.
In my opinion, the only material that bring noticeable effects to the water is the cast iron, typically represented by Japanese tetsubin.

Regards.
What about the clay kettles, like the ones from Lin's?

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Oct 27th, '14, 19:55
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Re: aluminium tetsubin

by William » Oct 27th, '14, 19:55

bonescwa wrote:
William wrote:
jjanek wrote:Thanks for reply, but one question.. why? Where is the problem with aluminium and what does this metal do with the quality of water?
I think the main problem is the affinity of water with metals. Usually, water boiled with aluminium and copper is not suitable for brewing tea, because it will bring to a worse outcome than water boiled with neutral materials.
Generally, neutral materials are glass, tin and silver.
In my opinion, the only material that bring noticeable effects to the water is the cast iron, typically represented by Japanese tetsubin.

Regards.
What about the clay kettles, like the ones from Lin's?
Technically speaking a clay kettle can bring to positive effects or negative effects to the brews. It depends from the affinity between the clay of the kettle and the clay of the teapot. You should try with a tea you know well and see how it goes.

Regards.

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Oct 28th, '14, 14:01
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Re: aluminium tetsubin

by miig » Oct 28th, '14, 14:01

Being someone using both glass and clay kettles, I might add that it depends on the tea and your tastes. I'm in love with the Lin's kettle and its effects on the water, but its not just a good/bad-thing. It changes the water in a very specific way, and if that is to your liking or not depends on your taste and the tea prepared. (And probably the clay of the pot, too).
I'd compare it to the effect of certain quality speakers on music - while there are some general statements that you can make, for example that your 2000W rock speakers might not be the perfect speakers for the violin sonata, it mostly depends on your personal taste - the one guy will like speakers which highlight the mids, others will want very deep and massive bass and the third one will want a very neutral playback. You can't have all of them, but its highly probable that there will be one combination that you will prefer.

Still... an aluminium kettle, thats certainly exceptional. Since I don't know about that specific combination, I'd rather not speculate.. but I'd guess that this kettle will be made of some kind of alloy, since pure aluminium seems not to be used very often.

Oct 29th, '14, 17:46
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Re: aluminium tetsubin

by Alucard » Oct 29th, '14, 17:46

There are potential health concerns with consumption of aluminum. I don't think anything has been proven yet but some say aluminum affects the brain and may cause Alzheimer's disease. Unfortunately aluminum is all around us in cookware, personal hygiene products, and even food. Something to consider.

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Nov 4th, '14, 07:12
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Re: aluminium tetsubin

by Drax » Nov 4th, '14, 07:12

I won't comment on any of the health speculation about aluminum.

However, I will say that I'm not sure that the kettle in the first post looks like it's made of aluminum -- mostly because the color of the oxidation ('rust') and the patina. The color of that oxidation or rust looks more like iron (a typically red-orange color). Aluminum oxidation or rust looks white or gray and almost... well, leprous.

Maybe it's got some iron in it? Or perhaps it's just dirty, but somebody didn't want to clean the kettle for fear of destroying the patina? Either way, it looks a bit off to me.

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Nov 4th, '14, 07:34
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Re: aluminium tetsubin

by Tead Off » Nov 4th, '14, 07:34

I would have to concur with Drax. But, often, Japanese kettles can be coated on the inside with a different metal than the exterior as in the case of copper/brass kettles with tin liners. A 100 year old aluminum kettle is a little bit hard to fully accept.

PS-Hojo claims Aluminum to be one of the worst metals for tea.

Nov 4th, '14, 16:37
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Re: aluminium tetsubin

by jjanek » Nov 4th, '14, 16:37

Thanks everybody
I wrote to the e-shop and they admitted the material probably is not aluminium, among other things because it is too heavy. Most probably it is copper coated with tin inside...
You helped me much
Honza

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Nov 4th, '14, 23:03
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Re: aluminium tetsubin

by Tead Off » Nov 4th, '14, 23:03

jjanek wrote:Thanks everybody
I wrote to the e-shop and they admitted the material probably is not aluminium, among other things because it is too heavy. Most probably it is copper coated with tin inside...
You helped me much
Honza
This should be okay to use as long as the tin inside has not worn away.

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