User avatar
Jan 15th 09 2:20 am
Posts: 402
Joined: Nov 9th 08 1:46 am
Location: NYC

by chingwa » Jan 15th 09 2:20 am

OK, I'm concerned.

I've been very careful with the new tetsubin kettle to keep it warm and dry and to never let water sit in it unheated for any extended peeriod of time, but already (3 weeks) I've started to notice a creeping orange color on the BOTTOM of the tetsubin (not inside, outside and underneath). I've been heating this on the gas stove in the kitchen as it's the only heat source I have. I know the gas converts to carbon dioxide and water vapor when burned... is it totally starting to rust out my new and expensive kettle??? what alternatives are out there for the gas stove? What do those tea masters here with cast-iron tetsubin kettles use?

The charcoal thread is interesting, especially for the health problems associated with even good quality charcoal...

Or am I overreacting, and this color is normal?

Jan 15th 09 4:36 am
Posts: 969
Joined: Dec 17th 08 8:13 pm
Scrolling: fixed

Need to spread the heat

by Intuit » Jan 15th 09 4:36 am

There are heat dissipaters you can purchase for gas stove burners to keep the heat from concentrating and forming hot spots on pots and pans.

Edit: The poster below suggests that rust would form from combustion water vapor. Methinks that would not be the case because of the heat carryover, driving vapors above and over the hot tetsubin. You would need a cold surface for condensation of water vapors from stove gas.

I would try that as a simple remedy that *may* work, if uneven heating is the culprit.

If you have a welding shop nearby, I would take your kettle in to the shop and ask them if they have an idea of why you are seeing rust form on the underside. These shop operators tend to know metal/cast iron specifics and might be able to give you an answer.

Of course, you should ask the vendor from whom you purchased the tetsubin, first.
Last edited by Intuit on Jan 15th 09 4:39 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Jan 15th 09 4:36 am
Posts: 316
Joined: Sep 12th 08 5:14 am
Location: Philippines

by odarwin » Jan 15th 09 4:36 am

where did you get your tetsubin from?

hojotea recommends using dry heat sources like induction heater, or electric stove.
they did warn people from using gas stove cause its liquid and will eventually rust your kettle.

-darwin

User avatar
Jan 24th 09 1:36 am
Posts: 402
Joined: Nov 9th 08 1:46 am
Location: NYC

by chingwa » Jan 24th 09 1:36 am

Yes, I got the tea kettle from Hojotea... and I had read the information about the gas stove and H2O issue... I guess I simply forgot about it after receiving the kettle.

In any case Akira Hojo, from Hojo tea, recommended to use an induction heater instead (how did I miss that part??? Thanks Odarwin...) and also recommended a technique for removing the rust on the outside of the tetsubin... heat it up nice and hot, then soak a soft rag in green tea and dab onto the rusted spots. the antioxidants in the tea in effect de-oxidizes the rusted iron back to normal iron. Worked like a charm!

Seriously, I highly recommend HOJO-tea if anyone is looking for a tetsubin. The customer service and attention he gave me throughout the whole process has been quite rare in this day and age... and all this from the owner of the company! They even followed up after hearing of my rust problem just to see if everything was ok :)

I haven't tried their tea, but I think I just might order from them next time I'm getting low... that type of attention builds lifelong customers.

User avatar
Jan 24th 09 2:18 am
Posts: 316
Joined: Sep 12th 08 5:14 am
Location: Philippines

by odarwin » Jan 24th 09 2:18 am

hi chingwa,
mind sharing pictures of your tetsubin?

-darwin

User avatar
Jan 24th 09 3:27 am
Posts: 5190
Joined: Dec 21st 06 4:33 am
Scrolling: scrolling
Location: Gainesville, Florida

by Salsero » Jan 24th 09 3:27 am

chingwa wrote: then soak a soft rag in green tea and dab onto the rusted spots. the antioxidants in the tea in effect de-oxidizes the rusted iron back to normal iron. Worked like a charm!
Boy, that green tea cures everything!

Jan 2nd 12 8:15 am
Posts: 2
Joined: Mar 1st 10 10:20 pm

Re: Japanese Tetsubins

by javusa » Jan 2nd 12 8:15 am

Anybody knows how/if you can work an used vintage tetsubin? I mean, can you file the rust as best as possible and be able to use it?

I have a chance to buy an old authentic (no lining) tetsubin which has some small rust spots inside but I wonder if this rust scraping is usually done and what the results will be (regarding the water taste after this is done)

Thanks.

j

User avatar
Feb 22nd 12 9:38 pm
Posts: 68
Joined: Feb 22nd 12 7:27 pm

Re: Japanese Tetsubins

by tkellyd » Feb 22nd 12 9:38 pm

Hello Javusa:

Not sure if you received an answer to your question but here goes. Yes, you can use an antique tetsubin. I usually scrub it out with a sturdy plastic OXO brush, then boil water in it for a couple of days until the water runs clear. I usually pour the water into a white bowl as this gives a better effect of clarity. If you really can't stand the red rust and white calcium deposits inside the tet, boil some green, oolong, or sheng Pu'erh in the tet. It will turn black. Of course you have to run water through it until the water becomes clear again. Hope this helps.