Apr 23rd 09 7:23 pm
Posts: 7
Joined: Mar 29th 09 5:02 pm

How do you pour water into a Tetsubin?

by Tengu » Apr 23rd 09 7:23 pm

I have a 46oz Tetsubin that has the typical immovable handle. I try to pour directly from the kettle into the pot but the handle is in the way and it prevents much of the water getting in. How do you pour water from the kettle into the pot?

User avatar
Apr 23rd 09 7:27 pm
Posts: 2085
Joined: Mar 15th 06 10:43 pm

by MarshalN » Apr 23rd 09 7:27 pm

Lower your kettle enough so that you're not pouring over the handle?

Apr 24th 09 4:56 pm
Posts: 7
Joined: Mar 29th 09 5:02 pm

by Tengu » Apr 24th 09 4:56 pm

That's how I've always tried it. I put the kettle directly above the opening and as I tilt it up it hits the handle. This prevents me from pouring half of the water out.

User avatar
Apr 24th 09 11:20 pm
Posts: 1962
Joined: Apr 6th 08 11:02 pm
Location: British Columbia, Canada

by chamekke » Apr 24th 09 11:20 pm

It's hard to answer without seeing a photograph of your tetsubin (and maybe your kettle). I suspect, however, that the answer may be to pour the water in by holding the kettle's spout just below the handle of the tetsubin. It may be tricky to get the angle right, though. Which makes you wonder... what was the traditional approach to doing it?

Apr 25th 09 5:39 pm
Posts: 7
Joined: Mar 29th 09 5:02 pm

by Tengu » Apr 25th 09 5:39 pm


User avatar
Apr 25th 09 7:26 pm
Posts: 21658
Joined: Apr 23rd 06 12:52 am
Scrolling: scrolling
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

by Chip » Apr 25th 09 7:26 pm

Dragons and tetsubins, perfect together! I would not mind finding a similar one in 16 ounces or less with the detail of the dragon.

Sorry I cannot add anything to the topic, but you are in good hands.

User avatar
Apr 26th 09 3:41 am
Posts: 2085
Joined: Mar 15th 06 10:43 pm

by MarshalN » Apr 26th 09 3:41 am

I don't understand how you can't pour water into the pot....

User avatar
Apr 26th 09 3:51 am
Posts: 2656
Joined: May 31st 08 6:44 am
Scrolling: scrolling
Location: Portland, OR

by Geekgirl » Apr 26th 09 3:51 am

I suspect he is trying to either pour right at the mouth, and can't tilt the tea kettle sharply enough, or is trying to pour from above the stationary handle. I'd try holding the kettle spout just below the curve of the handle, and pouring from there. You should be able to easily tilt around the handle, while still pouring clearly into the mouth of the teapot.

It's all about the angles. :)

User avatar
Apr 26th 09 4:06 am
Posts: 1962
Joined: Apr 6th 08 11:02 pm
Location: British Columbia, Canada

by chamekke » Apr 26th 09 4:06 am

I also wonder if the lid on that glass kettle is causing some problems... it looks like the part in the back juts upwards, and it could knock against the handle of the tetsubin. Maybe it would be easier if you removed the lid from the kettle before pouring?

User avatar
Apr 26th 09 12:38 pm
Posts: 83
Joined: Mar 5th 09 9:48 pm
Location: Ontario, Canada

by hpulley » Apr 26th 09 12:38 pm

I was confused at first when I saw your topic. I thought it was about getting water into a proper unlined iron tetsubin to use FOR boiling water but then I saw that you are using a lined tetsubin 'kettle' to brew tea. Traditionally, water is ladled into the tetsubin using a chabishaku (bamboo ladle) but that doesn't seem to be how you are using it though you never know, that might even work in your case to ladle boiling water into the pot.

I agree with the above, your glass kettle with its lack of a spout is why it is difficult to pour into your tetsubin; if it had a long spout it would be easy. It seems like your two pieces just aren't that compatible though you could try the old glass rod trick to help the water get into your tetsubin.

User avatar
Apr 30th 09 9:38 pm
Posts: 243
Joined: Dec 2nd 08 3:04 am
Scrolling: scrolling

by JP » Apr 30th 09 9:38 pm

Tip the tetsubin by the handle as you pour water from the kettle. The tetsubin would have to remain on a table to do that. Or use an offset funnel, as in the funnel's spout is towards one side rather than centered in the middle.