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Jul 4th, '17, 15:42
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Re: Gaiwan ID help

by stevorama » Jul 4th, '17, 15:42

Hmm wrote: Hmm. Perhaps I'm wrong to think this, but my assumption whenever I see a motif overlap another motif, is that it was done later, rather than early 20th. I assume that they were using a stencil and were just haphazardly drawing, spraying, or stamped the glaze on, rather than painstakingly using a brush to apply the glaze. That's just my general assumption. you will notice on the 壽 character, that the red circle is basically printed onto the "vine?" motif. I would think that in earlier periods, someone painting the object wouldn't do that, and would just make the vine a little bit smaller, or place it in a different place, etc. Or simply not paint the red circle right on top of it, but make it look like the "vine" overlapped the circle. Also the vine pattern is a bit too "exactly" repeated, so whoever did it, likely was "assisted"... Something you generally don't get with hand painted objects.

See e.g. http://gotheborg.com/marks/bild/1189_fullsize.jpg

In the 50s and even 60s I think a worker would have paid more attention to details. So I would place it in the last quarter of the 20th century, rather than any earlier.
I agree, the yellow gaiwan is not hand painted, but is stamped, stenciled, etc. My uneducated guess is that it's made in 70's. I'm still intrigued by the unglazed tan colored bottom of the plate and the maker stamp.

The others seem handpainted with the smallest gaiwan of the original 3 showing the finest detail.

Was the gotheborg link an example of the overlap you mentioned?

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Jul 4th, '17, 15:50
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Re: Gaiwan ID help

by stevorama » Jul 4th, '17, 15:50

Yes, using or not using fine teawares is a bit of a conundrum. I suppose however we enjoy them the most (in use or in glass) is the best way. We can't take it with us as they say, but we can give to relatives or sell! And maybe someone will make a couple bucks at our estate sale. Haha, morbid humor 8)

Jul 5th, '17, 12:52
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Re: Gaiwan ID help

by Hmm » Jul 5th, '17, 12:52

stevorama wrote:
Hmm wrote: Hmm. Perhaps I'm wrong to think this, but my assumption whenever I see a motif overlap another motif, is that it was done later, rather than early 20th. I assume that they were using a stencil and were just haphazardly drawing, spraying, or stamped the glaze on, rather than painstakingly using a brush to apply the glaze. That's just my general assumption. you will notice on the 壽 character, that the red circle is basically printed onto the "vine?" motif. I would think that in earlier periods, someone painting the object wouldn't do that, and would just make the vine a little bit smaller, or place it in a different place, etc. Or simply not paint the red circle right on top of it, but make it look like the "vine" overlapped the circle. Also the vine pattern is a bit too "exactly" repeated, so whoever did it, likely was "assisted"... Something you generally don't get with hand painted objects.

See e.g. http://gotheborg.com/marks/bild/1189_fullsize.jpg

In the 50s and even 60s I think a worker would have paid more attention to details. So I would place it in the last quarter of the 20th century, rather than any earlier.
I agree, the yellow gaiwan is not hand painted, but is stamped, stenciled, etc. My uneducated guess is that it's made in 70's. I'm still intrigued by the unglazed tan colored bottom of the plate and the maker stamp.

The others seem handpainted with the smallest gaiwan of the original 3 showing the finest detail.

Was the gotheborg link an example of the overlap you mentioned?
Yes, the gothenborg example was just to show the overlap and the vine motif is very similar to yours. Basically there's no variation that you would get with a hand painted piece.

Do you have a more detailed picture of the one landscape one? The colors look a bit too bold to be an antique or particularly old.

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Jul 5th, '17, 13:25
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Re: Gaiwan ID help

by jayinhk » Jul 5th, '17, 13:25

stevorama wrote: The dragon gaiwan is really interesting. I'm curious about the eyeless dragon and floating eyeball motif.

Also pictured is a Japanese gaiwan (from 1950's I think.) It has amazing handpainted koi. It works best for under boiling water, otherwise burnt fingers!
The floating eyeballs are pearls of wisdom ^_^ commonly depicted with Chinese dragons.

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Jul 6th, '17, 15:57
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Re: Gaiwan ID help

by stevorama » Jul 6th, '17, 15:57

jayinhk wrote: The floating eyeballs are pearls of wisdom ^_^ commonly depicted with Chinese dragons.
Interesting! Pearls of wisdom are good

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Jul 6th, '17, 15:59
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Re: Gaiwan ID help

by stevorama » Jul 6th, '17, 15:59

Hmm wrote: Do you have a more detailed picture of the one landscape one? The colors look a bit too bold to be an antique or particularly old.
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