Feb 6th, '09, 22:21
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Large Glass Gaiwan

by gerTEA » Feb 6th, '09, 22:21

I'm in the market for a glass gaiwan and found this "large" one offered by Dragon Tea House on eBay and I'm intrigued. Perhaps it's oversized so that one can handle it by the 'collar' without it getting too hot? It appears to have 3 small vents in the lid also. Has any one tried this style of gaiwan? Thoughts in general about the design?

Keep having technical issues here....and coming up with blank post when I try to insert a url!

Dragon Tea House on eBay - search on Large Glass Gaiwan - will try to follow up with pic.

Okay, here goes:

Image
Last edited by gerTEA on Feb 6th, '09, 22:27, edited 4 times in total.

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Feb 6th, '09, 22:23
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by Space Samurai » Feb 6th, '09, 22:23

I was thinking the same thing.

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Feb 6th, '09, 22:23
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by TaiPing Hou Kui » Feb 6th, '09, 22:23

Perhaps a little more information is needed gerTEA ;)

Feb 6th, '09, 22:31
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by gerTEA » Feb 6th, '09, 22:31

It holds 280ml (9.47 oz). Here's another pic:

Image

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Feb 6th, '09, 22:46
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by TaiPing Hou Kui » Feb 6th, '09, 22:46

I have never personally used this "style" of "gaiwan"...if you could even technically call it that.....it is neat looking though.....It appears like it should work fine.....are you more interested in it becuase of its unique design? Becuase of its volume capacity? Or just becuase its glass?

-Nick

Feb 6th, '09, 22:51
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by gerTEA » Feb 6th, '09, 22:51

TaiPing Hou Kui wrote:I have never personally used this "style" of "gaiwan"...if you could even technically call it that.....it is neat looking though.....It appears like it should work fine.....are you more interested in it becuase of its unique design? Becuase of its volume capacity? Or just becuase its glass?

-Nick
All of the above - I'm wondering if it's a bit easier to handle than the smaller glass ones, I love brewing greens in glass, and I tend to be a bit of a tea gulper which is why the larger size appeals....

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Feb 7th, '09, 13:01
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by Victoria » Feb 7th, '09, 13:01

I saw that one myself. I guess the "vents" are for straining - so it might be a slow pour, but still it looks kinda cool and might be fun to have. I say go for it!

Feb 9th, '09, 10:47
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by gerTEA » Feb 9th, '09, 10:47

Victoria wrote:I saw that one myself. I guess the "vents" are for straining - so it might be a slow pour, but still it looks kinda cool and might be fun to have. I say go for it!
Hi Victoria--

Yes, I agree the vents don't look like they'd be too effective for pouring. I haven't yet used a gaiwan but, after trying a number of higher volume brewing methods, I'd like one for brewing 'better' teas in smaller batches (I'm currently sampling my latest picks from Den's - Guricha, Fukamushi & Fukamidori Sencha).

It appears that there are a few 'standard' glass gaiwans in a few sizes, though LOTS of price variability (anywhere from $7-30, depending on the vendor). I can't tell much about quality from the photos, but I suspect they are all pretty comparable. Any recommendations as reasonably priced glass ones from a reliable vendor?

I know a number of folks have ordered teas from Dragon Tea House - has anyone tried their glass gaiwans?

Jennifer

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Feb 9th, '09, 12:47
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by Victoria » Feb 9th, '09, 12:47

Gaiwans work better with bigger leaf teas.
I'm not sure how well gaiwans work with sencha.
Someone else can help you with that.

The one above my be the best for sencha in the long run.

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by Pentox » Feb 9th, '09, 12:51

gerTEA wrote: Yes, I agree the vents don't look like they'd be too effective for pouring. I haven't yet used a gaiwan but, after trying a number of higher volume brewing methods, I'd like one for brewing 'better' teas in smaller batches (I'm currently sampling my latest picks from Den's - Guricha, Fukamushi & Fukamidori Sencha).
In general you should avoid brewing fukamushi in large quantities. The taste of the tea changes greatly after pouring with fuka. In general as well brewing sencha in a gaiwan is very hard to do since sencha is some of the smallest leaf around. You'll end up pouring more leaf in your cup than you would like.

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by snafu » Feb 9th, '09, 13:23

With careful pouring, it's quite possible to use a gaiwan for sencha, even fukamushi. You just have to keep the lid fairly tight and accept a rather slow pour.

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by gerTEA » Feb 9th, '09, 13:48

snafu wrote:With careful pouring, it's quite possible to use a gaiwan for sencha, even fukamushi. You just have to keep the lid fairly tight and accept a rather slow pour.
Yeah, I'm starting to notice I get 'dregs' in my sencha even with a fairly fine steel infuser (I've been using the Bodum Yo-Yo). So, looks like I'd need to proceed carefully if I try out the gaiwan.

How do other folks brew their Sencha?

I'm also trying out Den's Houjicha as a low-caffeine, nighttime option - love it! And the larger leaf looks like it would work well in the gaiwan.

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by gerTEA » Feb 9th, '09, 13:54

Pentox wrote:
gerTEA wrote: Yes, I agree the vents don't look like they'd be too effective for pouring. I haven't yet used a gaiwan but, after trying a number of higher volume brewing methods, I'd like one for brewing 'better' teas in smaller batches (I'm currently sampling my latest picks from Den's - Guricha, Fukamushi & Fukamidori Sencha).
In general you should avoid brewing fukamushi in large quantities. The taste of the tea changes greatly after pouring with fuka. In general as well brewing sencha in a gaiwan is very hard to do since sencha is some of the smallest leaf around. You'll end up pouring more leaf in your cup than you would like.
Thanks for the tip on the Fukamushi - I'm new to anything beyond a generic sencha. So far, I'm loving Den's Fuka-midori - yum :-)

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by Chip » Feb 9th, '09, 13:58

Most Japanese tea aficioados will usually get a kyusu which is perfect for Japanese greens ... in fact made for it. Once you have one, I doubt you will want to mess with a gaiwan for Japanese greens, saving that for Chinese greens, etc.

Since you mentioned Den's, they have several. Most Japanese tea vendors who specialize in Japanese tea will have a few. O-Cha for instance ...
Image
One of my faves!!!

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by gerTEA » Feb 9th, '09, 14:15

Chip wrote:Most Japanese tea aficioados will usually get a kyusu which is perfect for Japanese greens ... in fact made for it. Once you have one, I doubt you will want to mess with a gaiwan for Japanese greens, saving that for Chinese greens, etc.

Since you mentioned Den's, they have several. Most Japanese tea vendors who specialize in Japanese tea will have a few. O-Cha for instance ...
Image
One of my faves!!!
I'd been focusing on glass because I love the aesthetic and have some concerns about possible lead in pottery/glazes....but, geez, that's a darn handsome pot! (oh, these tea wares are dangerously seductive!)

I have admired some of the others in that style (which I now know is called a kyusu - thanks!) I really like the 'side handle' design.

Hmmm, so is lead a real concern with the Japanese earthenwares?

And where would a budget-conscious novice find a 'starter' kyusu?

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