User avatar
Mar 4th 09 1:40 am
Posts: 797
Joined: Feb 2nd 09 1:31 am
Location: Columbus, Ohio

Has anyone used or heard about this teapot?

by brad4419 » Mar 4th 09 1:40 am

I have been looking for a good gaiwan or teapot thats about 10oz for everyday tea brewing. I want glass because I want to make all different kinds of teas in it and something on the cheaper side. This 12oz is my favorite so far.

http://cgi.ebay.com/Chinese-Clear-Glass ... c0.m14[url]

Has anyone used this before?
Does it have any negatives or problems you can see?

User avatar
Mar 6th 09 5:37 pm
Posts: 797
Joined: Feb 2nd 09 1:31 am
Location: Columbus, Ohio

by brad4419 » Mar 6th 09 5:37 pm

Because of the lack of responses I will guess or assume that this is a normal, pretty good glass teapot that no one has. Most regulars on here probably use gaiwans or yixing or brewing mugs and people new to teaware like me are scratching their heads saying I don't know.

If there was a major problem with it someone would have enjoyed pointing it out(I know I would have :) ). So I will order it soon and write a review.

Also, yunnan Sourcing has the same thing for $1 cheaper so thats where I will order it.

User avatar
Mar 6th 09 5:50 pm
Posts: 21658
Joined: Apr 23rd 06 12:52 am
Scrolling: scrolling
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

by Chip » Mar 6th 09 5:50 pm

I have a smaller glass one, similar but not the same from DTH. I like it quite a bit but am not sure how it would hold up to everyday use.

I guess you will find out. :D

User avatar
Mar 6th 09 5:59 pm
Posts: 1052
Joined: Jan 16th 08 12:24 am
Location: Syracuse, NY

by Cinnamon Kitty » Mar 6th 09 5:59 pm

The only problem that I see is that the vent on the lid is in the middle of the knob, which means that it will be difficult to hold the lid on. Glass also gets incredibly hot to handle, which means that you might need a pot holder or a tea towel to keep the lid on which pouring without burning yourself. The strainer in the spout can be a pain to remove and clean as well, but it is definitely doable. Glass is fine for everyday use. I used the 16oz glass pot that I had almost every day until I broke the lid. The pot that you linked seems to have a better way to keep the lid on so it might be less of a problem for you than it was for me.

User avatar
Mar 6th 09 6:29 pm
Posts: 21658
Joined: Apr 23rd 06 12:52 am
Scrolling: scrolling
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

by Chip » Mar 6th 09 6:29 pm

Are they implying that the lid will not slip off while pouring w/o holding? I see that working less than 100% of the time ... :?

User avatar
Mar 9th 09 11:05 pm
Posts: 797
Joined: Feb 2nd 09 1:31 am
Location: Columbus, Ohio

by brad4419 » Mar 9th 09 11:05 pm

Thanks so much for the help Chip and Cinnamon kitty. I hope it can hold up to everyday use but as you said Chip I will find out.
Chip wrote:Are they implying that the lid will not slip off while pouring w/o holding? I see that working less than 100% of the time ... :?
:lol: and if the slip proof lid slips once then it really wont be slipping anymore except into the trash in 1000 pieces.

Mar 10th 09 4:46 am
Posts: 238
Joined: Sep 18th 08 3:36 am
Location: Home, home on the range

by t4texas » Mar 10th 09 4:46 am

If your heart desires a glass teapot, that's fine. But I would not recommend it for everyday, everything brewing. If you need 10 ounces, I would go for a ceramic teapot. You can find several types in most Asian grocery markets for $10 or less. Or get a Polish ceramic teapot or a Brown Betty from the UK for about $19 - 20. Not indestructable, but more so than glass.

If glass it is, then you may find one cheaper at import stores.

User avatar
Mar 10th 09 8:06 am
Posts: 626
Joined: Mar 4th 08 8:53 am
Location: Peoria, IL

by Trioxin » Mar 10th 09 8:06 am

some ceramic ones you may be interested in... at great prices none the less.

http://www.crateandbarrel.com/family.as ... 50&f=27559

http://www.republicoftea.com/templates/ ... navID=1769

User avatar
Mar 10th 09 2:39 pm
Posts: 1005
Joined: Feb 8th 08 7:22 pm
Location: Fort Worth, Texas

by auggy » Mar 10th 09 2:39 pm

t4texas wrote:If your heart desires a glass teapot, that's fine. But I would not recommend it for everyday, everything brewing.
Out of curiosity, why not? I use a glass tea pot for my everyday brewing. Mind you, it is my second one since I broke the first one dropping a large Pyrex measuring cup on it, but I think most of my pots wouldn't have come away from that unscathed.

Mar 10th 09 3:23 pm
Posts: 238
Joined: Sep 18th 08 3:36 am
Location: Home, home on the range

by t4texas » Mar 10th 09 3:23 pm

auggy wrote:
t4texas wrote:If your heart desires a glass teapot, that's fine. But I would not recommend it for everyday, everything brewing.
Out of curiosity, why not? I use a glass tea pot for my everyday brewing. Mind you, it is my second one since I broke the first one dropping a large Pyrex measuring cup on it, but I think most of my pots wouldn't have come away from that unscathed.
The only reason not to get a glass teapot, of course, is that they are notoriously poor at dodging Pyrex measuring cups. :P Glass is simply more likely not to appreciate getting whacked, even gently, compared to other materials.

I think glass pots are probably best suited to green and white teas, since you want lower temps. And it's cool to watch the leaves unfurl. But probably not as good in the heat retention department when it comes to Oolongs, Puerh, Red and Black teas.

If you are going to spend upwards of $20, why not get a glass pot at an import shop such as World Market for $12 or less and a ceramic one at an Asian market or about $7 or $8? Best of both.

But whatever suits your fancy, it is unlikely to be your only pot for long if you hang around this crowd for long.

User avatar
Mar 10th 09 7:02 pm
Posts: 2004
Joined: Mar 3rd 09 10:18 pm

by entropyembrace » Mar 10th 09 7:02 pm

Glass does hold heat fairly well, when baking with glass dishes one of the issues is that it stays hot for a very long time compared to ceramic and metal baking dishes.

But it's going to take that heat from the tea since you're not baking it. :P

User avatar
Mar 10th 09 8:44 pm
Posts: 1005
Joined: Feb 8th 08 7:22 pm
Location: Fort Worth, Texas

by auggy » Mar 10th 09 8:44 pm

t4texas wrote:
auggy wrote:
t4texas wrote:If your heart desires a glass teapot, that's fine. But I would not recommend it for everyday, everything brewing.
Out of curiosity, why not? I use a glass tea pot for my everyday brewing. Mind you, it is my second one since I broke the first one dropping a large Pyrex measuring cup on it, but I think most of my pots wouldn't have come away from that unscathed.
The only reason not to get a glass teapot, of course, is that they are notoriously poor at dodging Pyrex measuring cups. :P
:lol: So true!

My first glad one was single walled, and you are right - I found it had lower heat retention which worked great for greens but not as great for blacks. My current one is a double walled glass one. I have to leave the lid off when steeping greens! :)

User avatar
Jun 26th 09 1:34 pm
Posts: 797
Joined: Feb 2nd 09 1:31 am
Location: Columbus, Ohio

by brad4419 » Jun 26th 09 1:34 pm

Update!

I did end up with this pot except I bought it from yunnanSourcing instead. Its been around 3 months of everyday use of 2-3 times a day and is working out perfectly. It brews just the right amount for me 10-11oz, the coil does a good job holding leaves except on sencha but thats expected. The amazing part is that I really like the slip proof lid :shock: It actually holds in tight and has to be turned almost upside down before the lid falls off. I still hold the lid just in case but when I forget its got me covered.

User avatar
Jun 27th 09 11:05 pm
Posts: 54
Joined: Apr 9th 09 2:16 am

by fmoreira272 » Jun 27th 09 11:05 pm

brad4419 wrote: The amazing part is that I really like the slip proof lid :shock: It actually holds in tight and has to be turned almost upside down before the lid falls off. I still hold the lid just in case but when I forget its got me covered.
+1
I have a similar teapot from Teaposy (http://www.teaposy.com/glass.htm). the coil strainer does a very good in holding the leaves and surprisingly easy to clean. my only problem is that its 24oz and i needed something for one serving so i ordered the one from yunnanSourcing. Both teapots have been standing heavy use and im quite satisfied with them specially when brewing flowering and white teas.

User avatar
Jun 27th 09 11:27 pm
Posts: 5190
Joined: Dec 21st 06 4:33 am
Scrolling: scrolling
Location: Gainesville, Florida

by Salsero » Jun 27th 09 11:27 pm

I have several glass teapots and sharing pitchers from Gordon at DTH, including this one. The funny looking strainer really does work well. I am impressed by your report of the slip-proof lid! Great invention.

Mine are all much smaller than yours, but Gordon seems to carry an amazing quality and variety of glass.

Glass rocks!