Mar 6th 19 6:11 pm
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To dry or not to dry

by Teobazbo » Mar 6th 19 6:11 pm

Hello everybody at a tea meeting in my hometown, one of the guests speakers suggested to rinse and dry the teapot (even with hot air) after having made tea, because the porosity of clay could develop mildews.
Isn't this the opposite of aging?

Mar 26th 19 10:57 pm
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Joined: Feb 15th 19 3:36 am

Re: To dry or not to dry

by braden87 » Mar 26th 19 10:57 pm

Teobazbo wrote: Hello everybody at a tea meeting in my hometown, one of the guests speakers suggested to rinse and dry the teapot (even with hot air) after having made tea, because the porosity of clay could develop mildews.
Isn't this the opposite of aging?
I know some folks will pour boiling water over the pot to make it hot, which helps evaporation. Personally, I do not. I just remove the leaves, shake out excess water and store without the lid fully on - have not developed any mildew.

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Apr 7th 19 7:26 pm
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Re: To dry or not to dry

by imkvn » Apr 7th 19 7:26 pm

braden87 wrote:
Teobazbo wrote: Hello everybody at a tea meeting in my hometown, one of the guests speakers suggested to rinse and dry the teapot (even with hot air) after having made tea, because the porosity of clay could develop mildews.
Isn't this the opposite of aging?
I know some folks will pour boiling water over the pot to make it hot, which helps evaporation. Personally, I do not. I just remove the leaves, shake out excess water and store without the lid fully on - have not developed any mildew.
I make my tea. Then wipe off the moisture on the outer surface. Your water may leave hard mineral deposits on the outside of your pot. I dump the leaves into a trashcan, shake it out a bit. Store it with the lid off for a day. The remaining leaves in the pot dry out. Dump it in the trash. Then I put the lid on.

Mold can occur in different climates. If it happens you can rinse and scrub the inside with a soft toothbrush. Rinse with hot water. ect.

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Apr 8th 19 10:37 am
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Location: China

Re: To dry or not to dry

by Teasenz » Apr 8th 19 10:37 am

Teobazbo wrote: Hello everybody at a tea meeting in my hometown, one of the guests speakers suggested to rinse and dry the teapot (even with hot air) after having made tea, because the porosity of clay could develop mildews.
Isn't this the opposite of aging?
Ideally you rinse the teapot with water and then dry it with a cloth. Then let it further dry out without putting the lid on the pot. Drying with hot air is very uncommon, never heard of it.

Why would it be the opposite of aging? Can you clarify what you mean?

Apr 14th 19 6:06 pm
Posts: 19
Joined: Jul 24th 18 3:51 pm

Re: To dry or not to dry

by Teobazbo » Apr 14th 19 6:06 pm

Teasenz wrote:
Teobazbo wrote: Hello everybody at a tea meeting in my hometown, one of the guests speakers suggested to rinse and dry the teapot (even with hot air) after having made tea, because the porosity of clay could develop mildews.
Isn't this the opposite of aging?
Ideally you rinse the teapot with water and then dry it with a cloth. Then let it further dry out without putting the lid on the pot. Drying with hot air is very uncommon, never heard of it.

Why would it be the opposite of aging? Can you clarify what you mean?
For aging I mean to let the teapot soak part of the tea at the end of the session while drying, something like IMKV wrote up here. In the past I didn't always rinse every time the teapot , I just put them upside down and let dry to promote an inside patina/ coating be able to form.