Feb 13th 19 2:53 am
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How to tell if a Yixing Teapot is Handmade or Half Handmade

by Roh249 » Feb 13th 19 2:53 am

Hi. I've been using Yixing teapots for a while and I want to learn more about them. I was wondering if you guys have any tips on identifying whether a Yixing Teapot is Handmade vs half handmade. Thanks

Mar 15th 19 4:03 pm
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Re: How to tell if a Yixing Teapot is Handmade or Half Handmade

by DailyTX » Mar 15th 19 4:03 pm

Hi Roh249, that is a very difficult question to answer. I am no expert on it but in general, I would first look and feel for the construction inside of the pot. Older pots may have a seam that can be seen or feel by touch. For modern pots, some have them, some don’t have them, and some would fake it by adding a seam. Then, I would look for tool marks inside and outside, the stamp, etc. I remember there was a saying that there is no perfect yixing zisha pot, more experience folks are able to see each pot differently. I often would read something about yixing zisha then I would check my pots and gain experience from it.

Mar 21st 19 1:52 am
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Re: How to tell if a Yixing Teapot is Handmade or Half Handmade

by oolongtimenosee » Mar 21st 19 1:52 am

Roh249 wrote: Hi. I've been using Yixing teapots for a while and I want to learn more about them. I was wondering if you guys have any tips on identifying whether a Yixing Teapot is Handmade vs half handmade. Thanks
https://www.mudandleaves.com/teatime-bl ... y-handmade

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Apr 7th 19 7:20 pm
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Re: How to tell if a Yixing Teapot is Handmade or Half Handmade

by imkvn » Apr 7th 19 7:20 pm

Roh249 wrote: Hi. I've been using Yixing teapots for a while and I want to learn more about them. I was wondering if you guys have any tips on identifying whether a Yixing Teapot is Handmade vs half handmade. Thanks
I would say that most are slip cast. The others are molded then hand placed pieces. Usually you can tell by near the spout and handle. It wont look perfect, usually some lines from smoothing or doesn't look like a machine did it. You really don't know what your getting unless you know the maker. There's a lot of factory copies and replicas.

I'd say most are slip cast. A little are half hand and very little are actually handmade. Half-hand probably cost 200-500. Hand-made probably cost 500-limitless. Sad thing is you probably will never know. I have a pot that is probably slip cast then hand carved a dragon and phoenix. It's painted by hand. Is it hand or half hand. I have other pots that have unique qualities about them.

At the end of the day be happy and drink some tea.

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Jul 11th 19 3:37 pm
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Re: How to tell if a Yixing Teapot is Handmade or Half Handmade

by TEAMOOD » Jul 11th 19 3:37 pm

A little advice from a local folk of Yixing:
Molded(semi-hand-made) or Fully hand-made.[here machine-made excluded from comparison).
just focus on three core aspects(personal view):
A. Material quality(other clays besides zisha excluded)
B. Techniques on the work(comfortable on outlook?handy to use?)
C. Fame of author(applicable to evaluate when buying a luxury one at overseas stock costs over 200USD.)

Jul 15th 19 2:18 pm
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Re: How to tell if a Yixing Teapot is Handmade or Half Handmade

by lopin » Jul 15th 19 2:18 pm

TEAMOOD wrote: A little advice from a local folk of Yixing:
Molded(semi-hand-made) or Fully hand-made.[here machine-made excluded from comparison).
just focus on three core aspects(personal view):
A. Material quality(other clays besides zisha excluded)
B. Techniques on the work(comfortable on outlook?handy to use?)
C. Fame of author(applicable to evaluate when buying a luxury one at overseas stock costs over 200USD.)
Hi Teamood, it seems you could be able to help. please can you advice on author of this teapot?
60411077_10157357376729781_7653858199392485376_o.jpg
60334704_10157357376654781_6812519040053936128_n.jpg
IMG_20190517_182008.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

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Jul 15th 19 3:28 pm
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Re: How to tell if a Yixing Teapot is Handmade or Half Handmade

by TEAMOOD » Jul 15th 19 3:28 pm

lopin wrote:
TEAMOOD wrote: A little advice from a local folk of Yixing:
Molded(semi-hand-made) or Fully hand-made.[here machine-made excluded from comparison).
just focus on three core aspects(personal view):
A. Material quality(other clays besides zisha excluded)
B. Techniques on the work(comfortable on outlook?handy to use?)
C. Fame of author(applicable to evaluate when buying a luxury one at overseas stock costs over 200USD.)
Hi Teamood, it seems you could be able to help. please can you advice on author of this teapot?

60411077_10157357376729781_7653858199392485376_o.jpg60334704_10157357376654781_6812519040053936128_n.jpgIMG_20190517_182008.jpg
Hi Lopin,
The seal reads in Chinese 刘海涛/Liu Hai Tao. Not found in National Database of Occupational Titles. so author should be one of ordinary makers. From the pictures as much as I can tell, the clay seems just so so, if the seller claimed it was Zhu Ni, then it'd be very ordinary one as likely power of iron oxide is added when preparing the clay which is common method of improving property/appearance of clay after being sintered. Please don't get misunderstood that this is not allowable as it is the same with the main ingredient contained in natural in zisha. When you cook, sugar and salt can be put in to make the food of favorable experience to the guest but no other non-eatable ingredients for sure. About the technique done on the work, from the finishing treatment on surface of lid and handle, very ordinary.

Serie of Shi Piao actually is a very technique-challenging design, not as easy to be made as it looks and is always set as the target practising teapot for entry level students.

Hope it did't cost you much. Anyway, it can be an option for entry-level of zisha too. The technique though is much better than other urgly ones I've seen.
Attached is two samples of mine.(the 2nd and 3rd photos were not taken very well as they look a little pale but in fact color is deeper.
mmexport1563203972655.jpg
mmexport1563203969863.jpg
mmexport1563204237762.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

Jul 16th 19 6:54 am
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Re: How to tell if a Yixing Teapot is Handmade or Half Handmade

by lopin » Jul 16th 19 6:54 am

TEAMOOD wrote:
lopin wrote:
TEAMOOD wrote: A little advice from a local folk of Yixing:
Molded(semi-hand-made) or Fully hand-made.[here machine-made excluded from comparison).
just focus on three core aspects(personal view):
A. Material quality(other clays besides zisha excluded)
B. Techniques on the work(comfortable on outlook?handy to use?)
C. Fame of author(applicable to evaluate when buying a luxury one at overseas stock costs over 200USD.)
Hi Teamood, it seems you could be able to help. please can you advice on author of this teapot?

60411077_10157357376729781_7653858199392485376_o.jpg60334704_10157357376654781_6812519040053936128_n.jpgIMG_20190517_182008.jpg
Hi Lopin,
The seal reads in Chinese 刘海涛/Liu Hai Tao. Not found in National Database of Occupational Titles. so author should be one of ordinary makers. From the pictures as much as I can tell, the clay seems just so so, if the seller claimed it was Zhu Ni, then it'd be very ordinary one as likely power of iron oxide is added when preparing the clay which is common method of improving property/appearance of clay after being sintered. Please don't get misunderstood that this is not allowable as it is the same with the main ingredient contained in natural in zisha. When you cook, sugar and salt can be put in to make the food of favorable experience to the guest but no other non-eatable ingredients for sure. About the technique done on the work, from the finishing treatment on surface of lid and handle, very ordinary.

Serie of Shi Piao actually is a very technique-challenging design, not as easy to be made as it looks and is always set as the target practising teapot for entry level students.

Hope it did't cost you much. Anyway, it can be an option for entry-level of zisha too. The technique though is much better than other urgly ones I've seen.
Attached is two samples of mine.(the 2nd and 3rd photos were not taken very well as they look a little pale but in fact color is deeper.
mmexport1563203972655.jpgmmexport1563203969863.jpgmmexport1563204237762.jpg
Thank you very much Teamood. I did not like the shape of shi piao from the looks but after starting using it i start to understand the ergonomics and geometry of it. It makes very nice hongcha and shu puerh. I did not pay much for it, it is second hand and original owner did not know how to price it properly :) thank you

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Jul 16th 19 8:04 am
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Re: How to tell if a Yixing Teapot is Handmade or Half Handmade

by TEAMOOD » Jul 16th 19 8:04 am

lopin wrote:
TEAMOOD wrote:
lopin wrote:
TEAMOOD wrote: A little advice from a local folk of Yixing:
Molded(semi-hand-made) or Fully hand-made.[here machine-made excluded from comparison).
just focus on three core aspects(personal view):
A. Material quality(other clays besides zisha excluded)
B. Techniques on the work(comfortable on outlook?handy to use?)
C. Fame of author(applicable to evaluate when buying a luxury one at overseas stock costs over 200USD.)
Hi Teamood, it seems you could be able to help. please can you advice on author of this teapot?

60411077_10157357376729781_7653858199392485376_o.jpg60334704_10157357376654781_6812519040053936128_n.jpgIMG_20190517_182008.jpg
Hi Lopin,
The seal reads in Chinese 刘海涛/Liu Hai Tao. Not found in National Database of Occupational Titles. so author should be one of ordinary makers. From the pictures as much as I can tell, the clay seems just so so, if the seller claimed it was Zhu Ni, then it'd be very ordinary one as likely power of iron oxide is added when preparing the clay which is common method of improving property/appearance of clay after being sintered. Please don't get misunderstood that this is not allowable as it is the same with the main ingredient contained in natural in zisha. When you cook, sugar and salt can be put in to make the food of favorable experience to the guest but no other non-eatable ingredients for sure. About the technique done on the work, from the finishing treatment on surface of lid and handle, very ordinary.

Serie of Shi Piao actually is a very technique-challenging design, not as easy to be made as it looks and is always set as the target practising teapot for entry level students.

Hope it did't cost you much. Anyway, it can be an option for entry-level of zisha too. The technique though is much better than other urgly ones I've seen.
Attached is two samples of mine.(the 2nd and 3rd photos were not taken very well as they look a little pale but in fact color is deeper.
mmexport1563203972655.jpgmmexport1563203969863.jpgmmexport1563204237762.jpg
Thank you very much Teamood. I did not like the shape of shi piao from the looks but after starting using it i start to understand the ergonomics and geometry of it. It makes very nice hongcha and shu puerh. I did not pay much for it, it is second hand and original owner did not know how to price it properly :) thank you
Hi Lopin,
You have quite a feeling about zisha!
Glad to know that my advice helped a little.