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Apr 20th, '16, 23:38
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Re: Yixing Stickers

by kyarazen » Apr 20th, '16, 23:38

BioHorn wrote:On topic for Yixing, off topic for stickers.

Am enjoying this blog:

http://bababu24.pixnet.net/blog/2
that blog belongs to Dr Lv whom was the author of the shuiping pot book from wuxing publications :)

his ex moniker online was 下港人 in t4u taiwan etc

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Apr 21st, '16, 16:08
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Re: Yixing Stickers

by BioHorn » Apr 21st, '16, 16:08

kyarazen wrote:
BioHorn wrote:On topic for Yixing, off topic for stickers.

Am enjoying this blog:

http://bababu24.pixnet.net/blog/2
that blog belongs to Dr Lv whom was the author of the shuiping pot book from wuxing publications :)

his ex moniker online was 下港人 in t4u taiwan etc
Wow. That makes sense. It seemed very in depth. The FB forum members have been nice.

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Apr 24th, '16, 05:17
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Re: Yixing Stickers

by TuoChaTea » Apr 24th, '16, 05:17

Ooohkay, so I checked the two 80's teapots I got from Essence of Tea (https://www.essenceoftea.com/blog/2016/ ... -february/) and I noticed a funny thing - one sticker is with white line in it and the second one is without the white line. The one with the line have a better printed rectangular on top and is covered by a partial lacquer, unlike the one without the line.

What do you think?
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Apr 24th, '17, 03:41
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Re: Yixing Stickers

by CheekyChipmunk » Apr 24th, '17, 03:41

Hi Chatters,

Here is another 'Green Egg' from a freshly arrived 70's Ba Le/Xian Po from EoT.
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Apr 24th, '17, 12:09
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Re: Yixing Stickers

by LouPepe » Apr 24th, '17, 12:09

CheekyChipmunk wrote: Hi Chatters,

Here is another 'Green Egg' from a freshly arrived 70's Ba Le/Xian Po from EoT.
I was given too much time and had to snatch up the other one of these! Hard to resist. Everyone jumps on the smaller ones, but I like to steep aged sheng longer than typical gongfu. This will work perfectly. Currently using a very nice 80's-90's di cao qing for aged sheng at around 130 ml. Li Xing shape so not far off from this. See how they stack up against each other. Speaking of which, I also picked up one of the private order di cao qings and looking forward to seeing that in person. The clays vary so much on those private orders.

What are you planning to brew with yours? Looks like it's thirsty :P

Apr 24th, '17, 19:05
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Re: Yixing Stickers

by ricegeek » Apr 24th, '17, 19:05

Very nice! I love that shape, since it has a low center of gravity, and very easy to handle. I didn't even realized EoT had these in stock, but it's probably better that way, since I don't need to have more temptation to buy more yixing. :lol:

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Apr 25th, '17, 09:41
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Re: Yixing Stickers

by chrl42 » Apr 25th, '17, 09:41

CheekyChipmunk wrote: Hi Chatters,

Here is another 'Green Egg' from a freshly arrived 70's Ba Le/Xian Po from EoT.
I have the same one..is the most common model that has a Green Egg on it these days..craftsmanship and clay quality are somewhat low-end for that period....

but quite a killer to brew Heicha :D

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Apr 25th, '17, 13:06
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Re: Yixing Stickers

by CheekyChipmunk » Apr 25th, '17, 13:06

chrl42 wrote:
CheekyChipmunk wrote: Hi Chatters,

Here is another 'Green Egg' from a freshly arrived 70's Ba Le/Xian Po from EoT.
I have the same one..is the most common model that has a Green Egg on it these days..craftsmanship and clay quality are somewhat low-end for that period....

but quite a killer to brew Heicha :D
Typical,

I finally fork out after lots of advice saying that f1 old clay is the best and straight away it appears even that is not necessarily true :? I was leaning the same way after receiving the pot, the clay is very rough and the workmanship obviously geared towards mass production. Am not sure how well it was fired as the clay is very dull and coarse to the touch.

@Lou I haven't brewed with it yet but maybe it sounds like it'll make some decent shu. I thought possibly old sheng might be a decent fit so I'll try out a few different things and see what fits. Also, my 'oldest' sheng is only around 13yrs old so I dont even really have what most would consider 'aged' sheng...

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Apr 25th, '17, 14:36
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Re: Yixing Stickers

by William » Apr 25th, '17, 14:36

chrl42 wrote:
I have the same one..is the most common model that has a Green Egg on it these days..craftsmanship and clay quality are somewhat low-end for that period....

but quite a killer to brew Heicha :D
Chrl, you are too much severe! :mrgreen:
That Zini clay used during the gree-laber period is not that bad. I personally like hot it brews many teas, i.e. aged puer, deep roasted oolongs, red teas ..
The craftsmanship, well, depends from teapot to teapot .. generally speaking not that fine, but often good enough (again, depends from teapot to teapot)!

Apr 25th, '17, 18:21
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Re: Yixing Stickers

by LouPepe » Apr 25th, '17, 18:21

CheekyChipmunk wrote: Hi Chatters,

Here is another 'Green Egg' from a freshly arrived 70's Ba Le/Xian Po from EoT.
Oh, no need to be whelmed! Believe me, that zini clay is much better than 98 percent of modern zini or any zini produced by factory 1 after the green sticker era. I think chrl42 just has too many gems and maybe isn't as appreciative of it as many of us would be :lol:

Coarse is not a bad thing. Something to remember is that some of the best pots take a while to season. That just means that they have good porosity and breathe well. Keep brewing the same tea in it and it will give much in return after the years As always, pairing up with the right tea is crucial. That means nothing you want to conserve high notes in (dc, gaoshan, green, fragrant young sheng, etc.) . I don't see the purpose of buying yixing pots (especially zini, qingshui, DCQ) if they are low porous, slick finishes. In those circumstances then you want to go for zhuni instead.

And for craftsmanship, I easily noticed from the pictures alone it's not among the best for factory 1, but neither are others that much better. Remember, these pots are hoarded and you better believe if a vendor comes across an old factory 1 pot with excellent workmanship, perfect firing, and nice clay they most likely won't want sell it, but keep it for themselves. EoT prices are more than fair considering what's out there and the work it would take to source these pots on ones own (e.g. flying, boarding, searching saturated markets, confirming authenticity, etc.).

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Re: Yixing Stickers

by chrl42 » Apr 25th, '17, 22:25

William wrote:
chrl42 wrote:
I have the same one..is the most common model that has a Green Egg on it these days..craftsmanship and clay quality are somewhat low-end for that period....

but quite a killer to brew Heicha :D
Chrl, you are too much severe! :mrgreen:
That Zini clay used during the gree-laber period is not that bad. I personally like hot it brews many teas, i.e. aged puer, deep roasted oolongs, red teas ..
The craftsmanship, well, depends from teapot to teapot .. generally speaking not that fine, but often good enough (again, depends from teapot to teapot)!

CR Zini also has lots of types..personally thinking, earlier the teapot was produced better the quality is.

Like, Hong Qingshuini types (produced during the CR) are pretty good ones, good color, purer texture and very smooth...the best example is CR Yuhualong (not green-egg Yuhualong),

Shen (dark) Qingshuini used during 70's is also a good one, many say it resembles Di Cao Qing....Shui Ping teapots produced during 70s also used good clay..

Coming to 80s, even Qingshuini decreases in quality (just personal view)...more impurities and coarser..IMHO the clay used to make Ba Le is left-over clay after using to make higher-end pots..but to compare with today-standard, still very good ones nonetheless

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Apr 26th, '17, 02:26
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Re: Yixing Stickers

by CheekyChipmunk » Apr 26th, '17, 02:26

Yes I realized I was quite reactionary in the moment when posting my consternation! Of course, I wasn't expecting to get a perfect 70's F1 pot, and the reason for my purchase (on top of hoping for a good brewing vessel) was simply getting my hands on 70's clay to be able to have an idea of how the material feels/behaves. I was interested to find the clay has quite a strong smell, which I find is somewhat similar to some of my 'tuition' pots. Is this a product of firing or the material itself?

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Re: Yixing Stickers

by William » Apr 26th, '17, 03:42

chrl42 wrote:
but to compare with today-standard, still very good ones nonetheless
This is exactly my point. I compare older clays (whenever it is from late Qing, R.O.C., 60s, 70s, and so on) exclusively to modern-processed clays, because this is essentially what is available to enthusiasts like us around the world (unless being based in strategic countries, like you and I).

I personally don't like most (if not all) of the factory clays used after the green label period, but I like some of the clays used during this period (while I adore every F1 clay used before '77). This Zini clay is in my opinion of good quality .. I use it a fair bit with a lot of different teas. A clay used during this period that I personally don't like is the hongni blended with qingshuini that can be found, for example, on 70 ml biandeng. Definitely too much porous.

CheekyChipmunk wrote:
Is this a product of firing or the material itself?
Try to (gently) clean the teapot with boiling water for a couple of minutes .. it's not necessary to use boiling water, you can just keep the water at 80 degrees or so, in order to avoid any issue. If the teapot is still strongly smelly, I would return it. All the teapots I own made of the very same clay are not smelly (but a lot of selection is necessary with this clay .. some are smelly, because of the firing).

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Apr 26th, '17, 07:00
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Re: Yixing Stickers

by CheekyChipmunk » Apr 26th, '17, 07:00

William wrote:
chrl42 wrote:
but to compare with today-standard, still very good ones nonetheless
This is exactly my point. I compare older clays (whenever it is from late Qing, R.O.C., 60s, 70s, and so on) exclusively to modern-processed clays, because this is essentially what is available to enthusiasts like us around the world (unless being based in strategic countries, like you and I).

I personally don't like most (if not all) of the factory clays used after the green label period, but I like some of the clays used during this period (while I adore every F1 clay used before '77). This Zini clay is in my opinion of good quality .. I use it a fair bit with a lot of different teas. A clay used during this period that I personally don't like is the hongni blended with qingshuini that can be found, for example, on 70 ml biandeng. Definitely too much porous.

CheekyChipmunk wrote:
Is this a product of firing or the material itself?
Try to (gently) clean the teapot with boiling water for a couple of minutes .. it's not necessary to use boiling water, you can just keep the water at 80 degrees or so, in order to avoid any issue. If the teapot is still strongly smelly, I would return it. All the teapots I own made of the very same clay are not smelly (but a lot of selection is necessary with this clay .. some are smelly, because of the firing).
I'm finding all this info very interesting so keep it coming guys! I guess I should be a bit more specific. I have boiled it already for a couple of hours and the smell remains. It's not the chemical smell of my tuition pots but rather than smelling like hot rocks, it has a more earthy sand/mud smell to it. I will test it on water/tea when I get some time and if it's giving the throat itches then I may consider returning it...

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Re: Yixing Stickers

by kyarazen » Apr 26th, '17, 07:38

CheekyChipmunk wrote: Yes I realized I was quite reactionary in the moment when posting my consternation! Of course, I wasn't expecting to get a perfect 70's F1 pot, and the reason for my purchase (on top of hoping for a good brewing vessel) was simply getting my hands on 70's clay to be able to have an idea of how the material feels/behaves. I was interested to find the clay has quite a strong smell, which I find is somewhat similar to some of my 'tuition' pots. Is this a product of firing or the material itself?
yes that is normal for zisha/qingshui for that era. it has a clay, mild earthy note. just feed it a load of tea and it will go away. the pot is correct and quite sought after in taiwan/malaysia. patinates quite quickly too

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