Jan 29th, '17, 19:00
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Re: NEW! Official Teaware of the Day!

by Bok » Jan 29th, '17, 19:00

Hmm wrote:
jayinhk wrote:Glazed porcelain doesn't appear to be an issue as far as lead, unless it is painted on top. With the mun shou, the paint is only on the outside, so it should be fine. We have a thread here where we discussed the lead concern.

Makes sense about printed porcelain being worth less. Got any pics of the 100+ year old stuff for $10? :shock:
True. But the fact that your lips still touch the outside overglazed elements, still makes me paranoid. As stated, I might be overly paranoid about it. If it's underglazed, then usually I don't care about it so much.

But an example of a cheapish plate. Basically what the peasants would have used back in the days. Often carved/stenciled with the family's name, since kitchens were often communal back then.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Antique-Chinese ... SwMtxXq4lE

That's definitely probably early 19th century. That's the buy now price, but if you have auctions you probably could get it cheaper.

There's other examples. I will post them when I have time. But canton export can go for cheap depending on condition as well.
Don't even mention how cheap they come if you look for them in Asia. Usually stacks of them dusting away in a shop for a few bucks per piece...

Jan 29th, '17, 19:31
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Re: NEW! Official Teaware of the Day!

by Hmm » Jan 29th, '17, 19:31

Bok wrote:
victoria3 wrote: ose rice cups on the other hand I have an aesthetic aversion to :?
I feel you. For me they look like how Chinatown sweet and sour pork tastes like... :mrgreen:
That's a pretty harsh statement haha. But it's probably true with the how shiny the glaze is! If you get the pre 1940s versions, they look a lot better... But I agree with the later stuff looking like sweet and sour pork. I can't even look at a lot of the newer gaiwans that come out these days... they just look so cheap, and the way they are printed just looks terrible in my opinion, and would rather go for a 70s one.

Even ones that say they are hand painted aren't, like these. http://www.ebay.com/itm/Chinese-pottery ... GGqaiFN6yg

Ones like these... http://www.ebay.com/itm/Blue-and-white- ... ol42W0cSNA Definitely not hand painted either. But the blue is just an awful color. Older stuff's blue are more mellow instead of that in your face chemical cobalt blue they used. Sometimes even greyish in tone.

I don't even know if they have hand painted ones these days. Has anyone seen one?

Jan 29th, '17, 19:57
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Re: NEW! Official Teaware of the Day!

by Hmm » Jan 29th, '17, 19:57

Bok wrote:
Hmm wrote:
jayinhk wrote:Glazed porcelain doesn't appear to be an issue as far as lead, unless it is painted on top. With the mun shou, the paint is only on the outside, so it should be fine. We have a thread here where we discussed the lead concern.

Makes sense about printed porcelain being worth less. Got any pics of the 100+ year old stuff for $10? :shock:
True. But the fact that your lips still touch the outside overglazed elements, still makes me paranoid. As stated, I might be overly paranoid about it. If it's underglazed, then usually I don't care about it so much.

But an example of a cheapish plate. Basically what the peasants would have used back in the days. Often carved/stenciled with the family's name, since kitchens were often communal back then.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Antique-Chinese ... SwMtxXq4lE

That's definitely probably early 19th century. That's the buy now price, but if you have auctions you probably could get it cheaper.

There's other examples. I will post them when I have time. But canton export can go for cheap depending on condition as well.
Don't even mention how cheap they come if you look for them in Asia. Usually stacks of them dusting away in a shop for a few bucks per piece...
This just went for an awesome price of $2.25! http://www.ebay.com/itm/Set-3-Antique-C ... true&rt=nc

Can you really find stacks of the above qing plates in Taiwan? If I remember the teamasters blog sells them for quite a bit. And the one above is certainly probably a bit older than the one he's selling, coming from the Jiaqing period. Probably made in Dehua, Fujian, rather than Jingdezhen, based on the blue.

Jan 29th, '17, 21:36
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Re: NEW! Official Teaware of the Day!

by Bok » Jan 29th, '17, 21:36

Not too difficult. Nowadays there are more and more fakes mixed alongside. But more so for cups than bowls and plates. Well teamasters is a business... those Anping jars can also be found with a bit more difficulty.

Jan 29th, '17, 21:37
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Re: NEW! Official Teaware of the Day!

by Bok » Jan 29th, '17, 21:37

In China it should be even easier to find and for even less. More fakes too though.

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Jan 29th, '17, 22:11
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Re: NEW! Official Teaware of the Day!

by jayinhk » Jan 29th, '17, 22:11

Hmm wrote:
jayinhk wrote:Glazed porcelain doesn't appear to be an issue as far as lead, unless it is painted on top. With the mun shou, the paint is only on the outside, so it should be fine. We have a thread here where we discussed the lead concern.

Makes sense about printed porcelain being worth less. Got any pics of the 100+ year old stuff for $10? :shock:
True. But the fact that your lips still touch the outside overglazed elements, still makes me paranoid. As stated, I might be overly paranoid about it. If it's underglazed, then usually I don't care about it so much.

But an example of a cheapish plate. Basically what the peasants would have used back in the days. Often carved/stenciled with the family's name, since kitchens were often communal back then.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Antique-Chinese ... SwMtxXq4lE

That's definitely probably early 19th century. That's the buy now price, but if you have auctions you probably could get it cheaper.

There's other examples.

Here's a canton export blue & white cloud and rain pattern. They used to use these as a ballast for ships! That's how ubiquitous they were back in the days. I'm fairly confident it's at least 1850s or so by the design. The actual dish itself, since they used to use blanks may be even older, from the 18th century. Funny thing is that you can probably see exact examples of these in George Washington's house, donated by Gen. Robert E. Lee, because I believe he married his granddaughter. The rarer shapes for these though can go for quite a bit more, e.g. a couple hundred if in good condition.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/ANTIQUE-CHINESE ... Swt5hYflH7

A plate like this one is probably around 100 years old. It has ridiculously thick overglaze enamels. http://www.ebay.com/itm/Antique-Chinese ... Sw8aNXGpss

But there's no way the buy it now price is accurate, and definitely if you were to get an actual action price on it, it would be much lower.

But there's cracks, you definitely can get some cheap stuff out there.

I bought this porcelain meat strainer for extremely cheap. http://i.imgur.com/qQZGakc.jpg I just use it as a top for my daily used tea boat being about 13"-14" wide, placed over a very large/wide bowl. It's at least 150 years old, but I don't care, it's cracked already. You actually don't really notice the cracks once objects are on it, and they have all since turned brown with tea stains. Something like this if there wasn't cracks would probably be worth a few hundred USD.
Thanks, good info. :)

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Jan 29th, '17, 22:13
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Re: NEW! Official Teaware of the Day!

by jayinhk » Jan 29th, '17, 22:13

Hmm wrote:
I don't even know if they have hand painted ones these days. Has anyone seen one?
Yes, no shortage of fancy handpainted ones on the mainland, but prices can get to nosebleed levels!

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Jan 29th, '17, 22:17
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Re: NEW! Official Teaware of the Day!

by jayinhk » Jan 29th, '17, 22:17

Bok wrote:In China it should be even easier to find and for even less. More fakes too though.
Would disagree about being able to find them for less; China has the demand and $$$. Plenty of fakes though--they have huge strip malls full of fake antiques up there. You could spend days in just one of the malls alone if you really wanted to check stuff out!

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Jan 30th, '17, 01:01
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Re: NEW! Official Teaware of the Day!

by victoria3 » Jan 30th, '17, 01:01

There are high quality Canton 18th-19th C porcelain pieces that are finely painted and elegantly crafted, a pleasure to handle, and then there are many more examples still available today that are sloppily painted, clunky, and heavy, those are easier to find for much less. Personally, I prefer 19th C Canton pieces from 1870-1890s they are more elegantly crafted in general.

Jan 30th, '17, 19:34
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Re: NEW! Official Teaware of the Day!

by Hmm » Jan 30th, '17, 19:34

victoria3 wrote:There are high quality Canton 18th-19th C porcelain pieces that are finely painted and elegantly crafted, a pleasure to handle, and then there are many more examples still available today that are sloppily painted, clunky, and heavy, those are easier to find for much less. Personally, I prefer 19th C Canton pieces from 1870-1890s they are more elegantly crafted in general.
For me, b&w canton export kind of tells me a story of what was going on there historically. The earlier pieces, from e.g Jiaqing have better "whites", and often well drawn. Then you go through the Opium war/Taiping Rebellion, and those pieces just look messy and poorly crafted, which makes sense since that whole area was in chaos. Then after that's over, the porcelain actually starts to look better again.

Early 20th century porcelain can actually be of really high quality, and is personally what I enjoy looking at the most since I find the historical context interesting, in particular qianjiang stuff, although ones by the masters go for thousands, so I'm priced out of those.

@JayinHK.

I think it really depends. Imperial pieces are often faked, and if they are high grade forgeries, they are actually still worth something, because the skill necessary to make them. I would say 99% of imperial grade pieces are fake out there. However certain things that were used by commoners or as they say fired in the "minyao" (peasant kiln), aren't super collectable, and if anything are pieces that people may acquire fairly cheaply to get their feet wet.

That said, they often say it's easier to get "geniune" pieces in the West, rather back at home, simply because the fakes haven't totally taken over the market here yet... Although there's now more and more reports that forgeries are showing up at the biggest auction houses these days.

Mar 1st, '17, 02:22
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Re: NEW! Official Teaware of the Day!

by Bok » Mar 1st, '17, 02:22

As we were recently speaking of those rice pattern cups, here is a modern, more tasteful example of this style I’ve come across: https://uk.pinterest.com/pin/568720259180928522/

If I am not wrong it’s from a Taiwanese product design start-up which do all sorts of modern interpretations of traditional house wares

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Mar 1st, '17, 10:21
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Re: NEW! Official Teaware of the Day!

by debunix » Mar 1st, '17, 10:21

Beautiful cups

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May 14th, '17, 13:52
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Re: NEW! Official Teaware of the Day!

by Ferg » May 14th, '17, 13:52

And took a couple pictures of this yuzamashi by Gisui. This is actually my first yuza! Don't know why I waited so long to get one.
First Yuzamashi.jpg
First Yuzamashi.jpg (26.26 KiB) Viewed 238 times
Love the feel in the hand and the lines throughout.
Front Bill.jpg
Front Bill.jpg (26.65 KiB) Viewed 238 times
And wouldn't be the same without a Gisui thumbprint, or two in the case of this yuza! I've come to endear the little personal touches.
Thumbprint.JPG
Thumbprint.JPG (28.77 KiB) Viewed 238 times

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May 14th, '17, 14:06
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Re: NEW! Official Teaware of the Day!

by victoria3 » May 14th, '17, 14:06

Beautiful piece ferg, the wheel thrown lines give it the appearance of still being wet fluid clay. I've gotten into the habit of using one of my yuzamashi (my avatar) to weigh and deliver precious leaf to the pot :D

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May 14th, '17, 14:12
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Re: NEW! Official Teaware of the Day!

by William » May 14th, '17, 14:12

I usually don't use them .. but I must say it is a lovely piece! Nice acquisition Ferg!

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