How many Hagi are enough?

1
25
16%
2-3
23
15%
4-5
13
9%
6-7
5
3%
8-10
3
2%
11 or more
5
3%
Infinity ... always room for one more
78
51%
 
Total votes: 152

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May 6th, '17, 04:19
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Re: The unofficial/official HAGI topic!

by Fuut » May 6th, '17, 04:19

sugataishi wrote: Why some Seigan Yamane's work are as cheap as 30 USD but some go in hundreds dollars? What is the difference?
pizzapotamus wrote: An inexpensive Seigan teabowl, about 10oz so it works either as a smaller matcha bowl or bulk consumption of other tea.
It depends on the amount of work, chance outcome of kiln effects and the size of his work. Seigan is quite known for mass producing works, there are sources you can buy chawan from without boxes etc, those are qualified as mass produced works. I have a lot of them and they are beautiful and functional. Other sources only sell cooperation works with special stamps etc. Just other sources only sell work with exceptional glaze effects and great forms. Personally I'm a big fan. I especially like his shell guinomi cups.

May 20th, '17, 00:31
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Re: The unofficial/official HAGI topic!

by sugataishi » May 20th, '17, 00:31

Fuut wrote:
sugataishi wrote: Why some Seigan Yamane's work are as cheap as 30 USD but some go in hundreds dollars? What is the difference?
pizzapotamus wrote: An inexpensive Seigan teabowl, about 10oz so it works either as a smaller matcha bowl or bulk consumption of other tea.
It depends on the amount of work, chance outcome of kiln effects and the size of his work. Seigan is quite known for mass producing works, there are sources you can buy chawan from without boxes etc, those are qualified as mass produced works. I have a lot of them and they are beautiful and functional. Other sources only sell cooperation works with special stamps etc. Just other sources only sell work with exceptional glaze effects and great forms. Personally I'm a big fan. I especially like his shell guinomi cups.
Thanks,
Do you know what type of kiln Seigan uses? Is it gas or wood firing or maybe electric. I am into the world of Japanese pottery for 3 years and I find it extremely hard to know more about pieces I am about to buy. I am Polish with no knowlegde about Japanese language. Do you have some English sources of Japanese pottery?

Nov 7th, '17, 08:48
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Re: The unofficial/official HAGI topic!

by absence » Nov 7th, '17, 08:48

Is there a tutorial or something that explains the various types of Hagi ware with names and their history? There seems to be all kinds of shades of blue, yellow, or orange, completely or partially covered by glaze, translucent or thick opaque white glaze with or without cracks and/or openings, etc. What is the traditional Hagi style refered to in the old "first Raku, second Hagi, third Karatsu" saying? How does Hagi ware differ from Ido ware? So many questions... :mrgreen:

Nov 12th, '17, 06:25
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Re: The unofficial/official HAGI topic!

by absence » Nov 12th, '17, 06:25

After searching around the web, I found no comprehensive overview, but various bits and pieces of information. It seems that both the blue glaze of Ao-Hagi and the opaque white glaze of Shiro-Hagi and Oni-Hagi were invented in the 20th century by Seigan Yamane, Kyuwa Miwa, and Jusetsu Miwa, respectively. The traditional style with subdued earth colours and translucent glaze seems to be pretty much the same as Korean Ido ware, only made in Japan. Is that a more or less accurate bird's-eye-view of Hagi styles?

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Nov 15th, '17, 14:12
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Re: The unofficial/official HAGI topic!

by rdl » Nov 15th, '17, 14:12

absence wrote: After searching around the web, I found no comprehensive overview, but various bits and pieces of information. It seems that both the blue glaze of Ao-Hagi and the opaque white glaze of Shiro-Hagi and Oni-Hagi were invented in the 20th century by Seigan Yamane, Kyuwa Miwa, and Jusetsu Miwa, respectively. The traditional style with subdued earth colours and translucent glaze seems to be pretty much the same as Korean Ido ware, only made in Japan. Is that a more or less accurate bird's-eye-view of Hagi styles?
You may find this book interesting. I've been tempted to purchase it.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Hagi-Famous-Ce ... SwdSNZ4jri
One factor of Hagiyaki, really all Japanese tea ware, is that it went out of fashion and declined for some time. The renaissance of kilns and their potters, I would venture to say, lead to new features in yakimono as you point out. Biographies of younger artists point out this new desire to experiment and shake things up, while still learning and adapting traditional methods.
The speed of this, within a few generations, has me very much wanting to keep following this new creativity all the while wondering where it will go?

Nov 16th, '17, 03:40
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Re: The unofficial/official HAGI topic!

by absence » Nov 16th, '17, 03:40

I see, that makes a lot of sense. In addition to wondering where it will go, it raises the question of what a designation like "Hagi ware" really means. When I started to look into Japanese teaware, I got the impression that the thick white glaze of Shiro-Hagi and Oni-Hagi was the defining characteristic of Hagi ware, so it was very surprising to discover that it's a modern invention! In the end I guess anything made in the town of Hagi technically is Hagi ware, regardless of style, but at that point it's not a very useful designation anymore. :?

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Dec 7th, '17, 14:02
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Re: The unofficial/official HAGI topic!

by rdl » Dec 7th, '17, 14:02

absence wrote: I see, that makes a lot of sense. In addition to wondering where it will go, it raises the question of what a designation like "Hagi ware" really means. When I started to look into Japanese teaware, I got the impression that the thick white glaze of Shiro-Hagi and Oni-Hagi was the defining characteristic of Hagi ware, so it was very surprising to discover that it's a modern invention! In the end I guess anything made in the town of Hagi technically is Hagi ware, regardless of style, but at that point it's not a very useful designation anymore. :?
I just came across this article that I found relates, and gives some answers, to this discussion.
http://asianartnewspaper.com/?p=1701

Dec 7th, '17, 16:11
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Re: The unofficial/official HAGI topic!

by absence » Dec 7th, '17, 16:11

Thanks! Very interesting article about the balance between tradition and innovation, and it confirms the close relation to Ido ware as well.

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