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Sep 2nd, '15, 12:33
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Re: bizen teaware appreciation anyone?

by Tead Off » Sep 2nd, '15, 12:33

hobin wrote:great! I love ohi too... apart from bizen I also like raku, oribe (especially kuro oribe chawan) and shino (btw. is there a piece of shino ware in you avatar?) :D
Raku and Ohi have a long history together. Ohi originated from Raku tradition. Bowls are hand formed. Two of the best museums are the Raku Museum in Kyoto and the Ohi Museum in Kanazawa. Great!

Fuut: the Sansuke yaki comes from one of the most beautiful provinces, Toyama. I took a bus through there a few months ago, but didn't have the time to stop and hunt for treasure.

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Sep 2nd, '15, 12:38
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Re: bizen teaware appreciation anyone?

by Fuut » Sep 2nd, '15, 12:38

Tead Off wrote:
hobin wrote:great! I love ohi too... apart from bizen I also like raku, oribe (especially kuro oribe chawan) and shino (btw. is there a piece of shino ware in you avatar?) :D
Raku and Ohi have a long history together. Ohi originated from Raku tradition. Bowls are hand formed. Two of the best museums are the Raku Museum in Kyoto and the Ohi Museum in Kanazawa. Great!

Fuut: the Sansuke yaki comes from one of the most beautiful provinces, Toyama. I took a bus through there a few months ago, but didn't have the time to stop and hunt for treasure.
For that i envy you, i just happened to stumble on it in google maps-street view and really that doesn't do it justice. I wish i could visit Japan, regardless of the specific prov! (though it would be scary at the same time)

Edit: its a shame the raku workshop isn't open to public, i think it was at some time. And yeah the history of Ohi yaki is quite interesting as is one behind raku (i think i remember reading this several times; "raku is considered to mean the potters technique, not so much the resulting products" - but take that with a grain of salt because i can't for the life of me remember where i read that.

I suppose every province had quite an interesting (to someone) history. Some are more flamboyant than others though, and that's i suppose what makes our knowledge..

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Sep 2nd, '15, 13:21
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Re: Bizen teaware appreciation anyone?

by hobin » Sep 2nd, '15, 13:21

The Ohi family and its wares are indeed closely related to Raku; the first Ohi potter was the son of Raku III, Donyu, and apprenticed to the fourth Raku master, Ichinyu. In Kanbun 6 (1666), Lord Maeda established the kiln under the guidance of Urasenke tea master Sen Soshitsu in the hamlet of Ohi, Ishikawa Prefecture. The first Ohi potter took the name Chozaemon.
(quote from here: http://www.japantimes.co.jp/culture/200 ... ecvXfmqqko)

btw I have this on the mail:
http://www.jauce.com/auction/d169959340

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Sep 2nd, '15, 13:32
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Re: Bizen teaware appreciation anyone?

by Fuut » Sep 2nd, '15, 13:32

That is nice! I like the koudai, and i'm just a fan of Ohi yaki, maybe partly because of the high society background it had (and the deep amber and other colors).

If i'm recalling correctly, i have 2 ohi chawan, and one is quite nice. I'll add a picture later, (soon i'm getting a cat on probation so see how he does with my own:)).

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Sep 2nd, '15, 22:34
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Re: Bizen teaware appreciation anyone?

by Tead Off » Sep 2nd, '15, 22:34

hobin wrote:The Ohi family and its wares are indeed closely related to Raku; the first Ohi potter was the son of Raku III, Donyu, and apprenticed to the fourth Raku master, Ichinyu. In Kanbun 6 (1666), Lord Maeda established the kiln under the guidance of Urasenke tea master Sen Soshitsu in the hamlet of Ohi, Ishikawa Prefecture. The first Ohi potter took the name Chozaemon.
(quote from here: http://www.japantimes.co.jp/culture/200 ... ecvXfmqqko)

btw I have this on the mail:
http://www.jauce.com/auction/d169959340
I like the sea foam on the black. Very nice. The seal is similar to Choam Ohi.
How do you find buying through Jauce? Can you use paypal with all the sellers? Is it complicated or a smooth process? Thanks.

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Sep 3rd, '15, 07:51
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Re: Bizen teaware appreciation anyone?

by hobin » Sep 3rd, '15, 07:51

Tead Off wrote:
hobin wrote:The Ohi family and its wares are indeed closely related to Raku; the first Ohi potter was the son of Raku III, Donyu, and apprenticed to the fourth Raku master, Ichinyu. In Kanbun 6 (1666), Lord Maeda established the kiln under the guidance of Urasenke tea master Sen Soshitsu in the hamlet of Ohi, Ishikawa Prefecture. The first Ohi potter took the name Chozaemon.
(quote from here: http://www.japantimes.co.jp/culture/200 ... ecvXfmqqko)

btw I have this on the mail:
http://www.jauce.com/auction/d169959340
I like the sea foam on the black. Very nice. The seal is similar to Choam Ohi.
How do you find buying through Jauce? Can you use paypal with all the sellers? Is it complicated or a smooth process? Thanks.
I don't know much about this chawan. also seller description is a bit vague. however for the price (15 dollars) I can't ask for more!

Jauce is allright. The fee (800 yen + 8%) is not too high and you can use paypal. They store your goods and when you decide they repackage your things and ship them all together. I usually use EMS shipping. it takes 4-5 days to italy. it is really smooth, the problem is that I keep buying things 8)

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Sep 3rd, '15, 08:11
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Re: Bizen, shino & other teaware appreciation anyone?

by hobin » Sep 3rd, '15, 08:11

a tebineri ao oribe from late edo era... can't decide if ugly or beautiful possibly both :lol:
http://www.jauce.com/auction/j363717568

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Sep 3rd, '15, 08:25
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Re: Bizen, shino & other teaware appreciation anyone?

by Tead Off » Sep 3rd, '15, 08:25

hobin wrote:a tebineri ao oribe from late edo era... can't decide if ugly or beautiful possibly both :lol:
http://www.jauce.com/auction/j363717568
It looks old and has charm. The seller says it feels good in his hands. If it goes anywhere near the price it is at, it's a steal, just like the other one you posted.

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Sep 3rd, '15, 08:38
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Re: Bizen, shino & other teaware appreciation anyone?

by hobin » Sep 3rd, '15, 08:38

In my experience ao oribe aren't as popular as kuro oribe (a decent ko-kuro oribe usually goes for 15-20.000 yen). You can have it maybe for 8000/10000 yen? However there are plenty on yahoo japan
Just keep on watching :D

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Sep 3rd, '15, 10:26
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Re: Bizen, shino & other teaware appreciation anyone?

by Tead Off » Sep 3rd, '15, 10:26

hobin wrote:In my experience ao oribe aren't as popular as kuro oribe (a decent ko-kuro oribe usually goes for 15-20.000 yen). You can have it maybe for 8000/10000 yen? However there are plenty on yahoo japan
Just keep on watching :D
I don't think this would be considered 'classic' oribe. For me, it's more like a Seto-Oribe. I've seen many mixes that don't fall into an either/or category. Many are just called Mino as an umbrella term. But, whatever one wants to name it, it's unusual and if it goes cheaply, seems like a good deal. The prices on these sites don't reflect the actual prices in Japanese galleries. Even the department stores are selling new chawan for hundreds of dollars, even thousands, if it is someone popular.

Sent a PM to you.

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Sep 3rd, '15, 11:07
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Re: Bizen, shino & other teaware appreciation anyone?

by hobin » Sep 3rd, '15, 11:07

Tead Off wrote:
hobin wrote:In my experience ao oribe aren't as popular as kuro oribe (a decent ko-kuro oribe usually goes for 15-20.000 yen). You can have it maybe for 8000/10000 yen? However there are plenty on yahoo japan
Just keep on watching :D
I don't think this would be considered 'classic' oribe. For me, it's more like a Seto-Oribe. I've seen many mixes that don't fall into an either/or category. Many are just called Mino as an umbrella term. But, whatever one wants to name it, it's unusual and if it goes cheaply, seems like a good deal. The prices on these sites don't reflect the actual prices in Japanese galleries. Even the department stores are selling new chawan for hundreds of dollars, even thousands, if it is someone popular.

Sent a PM to you.
yes, I think you're right. Could be a seto-oribe (I noticed that it is stated somewhere in the description). In fact there are many hybrids, like raku-oribe and karatsu-oribe.

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Sep 5th, '15, 08:51
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Re: Bizen, shino & other teaware appreciation anyone?

by hobin » Sep 5th, '15, 08:51

here's an oribe raku by Tannyu X (1795-1854)
http://www.raku-yaki.or.jp/common/img/c ... to32_b.jpg

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Sep 7th, '15, 11:08
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Re: Bizen, shino & other teaware appreciation anyone?

by Fuut » Sep 7th, '15, 11:08

Here's my favorite Ohi yaki chawan, by Choraku Ohi. Its in great shape, just the accompanying box that has some damage:)
Attachments
Ohi 1 copy.jpg
Ohi 1 copy.jpg (41.34 KiB) Viewed 761 times
Ohi 2.jpg
Ohi 2.jpg (37.05 KiB) Viewed 761 times
Ohi koudai copy.jpg
Ohi koudai copy.jpg (67.83 KiB) Viewed 761 times

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Sep 7th, '15, 11:42
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Re: Bizen, shino & other teaware appreciation anyone?

by hobin » Sep 7th, '15, 11:42

Beautiful chawan! I like the colour, not so common for ohiyaki...the typical ameyu glaze is there though, in the small vertical stripe and in the foot! also the shape is one of my favourite, with a 5 hill- edge(I've read somewhere that the hills represent the 5 kyoto zen temples)

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Sep 7th, '15, 12:57
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Re: Bizen, shino & other teaware appreciation anyone?

by Tead Off » Sep 7th, '15, 12:57

When I was in the Ohi Museum, I was surprised to see the amount of work that was not done with the common Ame glaze. There's a lot of varied work and much more than just bowls that we are used to seeing.

I didn't know that the 5 raised edges of a chawan represents the 5 Zen temples of Kyoto.

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