Product of Guatemala

Fully oxidized tea leaves for a robust cup.


Jan 12th, '07, 15:57
Posts: 27
Joined: Jan 13th, '06, 09:56

Product of Guatemala

by Mike in KY » Jan 12th, '07, 15:57

I thought I would try some black tea from Guatemala. I am enthusiastic about tea production in this hemisphere - real tea, not that herbal stuff. Unfortunately, I wasn't impressed. I bought a 2oz sample and have tried varying the brew, but no great joy. It's nice and strong and has nice body, but the taste is mostly drab and earthy. To be fair that might be from bad storage as I've read that high humidity can affect tea that way.

Has anyone else tried the Guatemalan :?:

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Jan 13th, '07, 06:15
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by EvenOdd » Jan 13th, '07, 06:15

Sounds interesting. I would totally try tea made in the western hemisphere to see how it stacks up. Though one should always consider they're probably new at doing what they do.

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Jan 29th, '07, 12:17
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West Hemi

by hop_goblin » Jan 29th, '07, 12:17

EvenOdd wrote:Sounds interesting. I would totally try tea made in the western hemisphere to see how it stacks up. Though one should always consider they're probably new at doing what they do.
Do you think that soil elements will make the taste different? I totally agree, I think it will be interesting!

Mar 25th, '07, 17:02
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by Mike in KY » Mar 25th, '07, 17:02

Soil, climate and method are sure to produce a unique tea. And probably like the varieties of tomato strains available, the strain of camellia grown will make a difference.

The tea is actually not bad, especially when concidering the disappointing Assams of the last two harvests. As EvenOdd said, it's a learning process and they are sure to get better.
If you like a stout cup it's worth a try. The TeaTable has it at a fairly low price.

The best plants for black tea, Camellia Assamica, need a warm wet growing season and a cool dry period before harvesting according to what I've read. I am curious if Guatemala could provide that. As I understand it, the reason the Assams have been so very disappointing the last two years is that it stayed warm and wet in the Assam region.
I would have thought areas of South America currently wasted on coffee farming would be more suitable.

Aug 31st, '07, 17:27
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Location: In the land of coffe, a tea lover..

by fedster » Aug 31st, '07, 17:27

Intresting topic, as this aproaches one question I had. I'm from Costa Rica (a litle bit south of Guatemala) which is a country that produce some of the best coffes in the world, but haven't heard much of tea grwoing over here and I have seen on some tea producer countries maps, that Costa Rica produce tea but at least that I know I haven't try it.

So Mike do you think Costa Rica will be a good place to grow tea? I have read a bit on tea growing and it seems that the weather here can fit, but of what you say not sure if for an all year havest maybe something arround november and december. when it's not raining that much.

I have been thinking of growing some tea plants mostly for honamental puposes and maybe try to make some tea, but not sure where to get seeds

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