Chinese Sencha

Made from leaves that have not been oxidized.


Chinese Sencha is...

A Freak of Tea Nature
1
10%
Delicious
1
10%
Not worthy of the title, leave it to the Japanese
4
40%
not a good name, let's call it Chinencha
4
40%
 
Total votes: 10

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May 30th, '07, 18:49
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Chinese Sencha

by tomasini » May 30th, '07, 18:49

Anyone had this blaspheme? :x
Cause I ordered some... :shock:
I just had to try it :lol:

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May 30th, '07, 21:09
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by Chip » May 30th, '07, 21:09

I refuse to respond on the grounds the Chinese may not sell me Long Jing. :shock:

I think you catch my drift

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May 30th, '07, 22:35
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by Space Samurai » May 30th, '07, 22:35

I drink chinese sencha, mostly because it is the only sencha we sell where I work right now, and it is good. But it is not a Japanese sencha.

There are a list of 30 new teas waiting to be approved for my store, including a kukicha, asamushi, and a fukamushi. Please oh please oh please...

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May 31st, '07, 12:49
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by tomasini » May 31st, '07, 12:49

fukamushi....

really? what is that?

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May 31st, '07, 13:17
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by Space Samurai » May 31st, '07, 13:17

fukamushicha is a deep steamed sencha from Kagoshima (I don't know if they all come from Kagoshima, but the one in question does). I think the process was developed in the 70's. It has a dark green liquor and a rather bold taste.

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May 31st, '07, 17:14
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by Chip » May 31st, '07, 17:14

...besides having a umm catchy name, yes, fukamushi is deep steamed, another words steamed a little longer than traditional sencha. As a result, it brews much faster and tends to be very flavorful and aromatic.

When you look at it, it looks like low grade sencha because it is small particles, a result of the deep steaming.

It can come from any of the major tea regions of Japan including Uji, Kagoshima and Shizuoka.

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Jun 2nd, '07, 22:42
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by augie » Jun 2nd, '07, 22:42

. . . and it's just fun to say over and over and over.
Fukamushi, fukamushi.

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Jun 4th, '07, 14:06
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by teaspoon » Jun 4th, '07, 14:06

So, um, how is the Chinese sencha?

~curious tsp

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Jun 5th, '07, 11:00
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by MarshalN » Jun 5th, '07, 11:00

Actually...... a lot of Chinese teas, back in the day, used to be steamed, therefore senchas.

Not true anymore though

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