Xian Cha - Long Jing

Made from leaves that have not been oxidized.


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Nov 18th, '12, 08:53
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Xian Cha - Long Jing

by chado.my.teaway » Nov 18th, '12, 08:53

Have any of you been practicing "xian cha"? The first time I met with the owner of the shop that entertained me Long Jing.

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Nov 29th, '12, 11:43
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Re: Xian Cha - Long Jing

by chado.my.teaway » Nov 29th, '12, 11:43

its a Xing Cha...my mistake.

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Dec 1st, '12, 14:33
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Re: Xian Cha - Long Jing

by gingkoseto » Dec 1st, '12, 14:33

or maybe a "xin cha"? "new tea"?
Southern Chinese are often confused about "g" in Chinese pinyin :mrgreen:

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Dec 2nd, '12, 08:56
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Re: Xian Cha - Long Jing

by chado.my.teaway » Dec 2nd, '12, 08:56


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Dec 2nd, '12, 09:09
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Re: Xian Cha - Long Jing

by SilentChaos » Dec 2nd, '12, 09:09

AFAIK, waking up the tea is sometimes a step for brewing certain kinds of teas. The wash CAN sometimes achieve the same effect. I haven't seen it much myself in brewing long jing or green teas in general though.
Last edited by SilentChaos on Dec 2nd, '12, 18:47, edited 1 time in total.

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Dec 2nd, '12, 17:44
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Re: Xian Cha - Long Jing

by gingkoseto » Dec 2nd, '12, 17:44

chado.my.teaway wrote:No. Xing Cha.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5kff7Oxa ... re=related

;))

Oh I see! Usually I put small amount of water before putting in the tea and then swirl the cup a bit after putting in the tea and before filling the cup with hot water. Somewhat similar to what she does except putting water before the tea.

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Dec 9th, '12, 21:10
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Re: Xian Cha - Long Jing

by Evan Draper » Dec 9th, '12, 21:10

醒, xǐng, "to rouse." Often used to mean simply "wake up," but the 酉 radical means it has something to do with a jar, specifically to recover from drunkenness!

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Dec 9th, '12, 21:23
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Re: Xian Cha - Long Jing

by jayinhk » Dec 9th, '12, 21:23

Thanks for sharing. I usually flash rinse my LJ before brewing, but maybe some swirling in the first infusion might be a good thing.

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Dec 12th, '12, 00:29
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Re: Xian Cha - Long Jing

by Tead Off » Dec 12th, '12, 00:29

jayinhk wrote:Thanks for sharing. I usually flash rinse my LJ before brewing, but maybe some swirling in the first infusion might be a good thing.

Really no need to flash rinse LJ or most green teas. Maybe brewing 1st brew a bit longer because you are going from dry to wet and the water needs more time to penetrate. Many myths associated with flash rinsing and 'cleaning' most teas.

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Dec 20th, '12, 14:10
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Re: Xian Cha - Long Jing

by Evan Draper » Dec 20th, '12, 14:10

Been meaning to try this method for a while. But my Longjing wouldn't sink after several minutes! Guess it got so drunk it wouldn't rouse...the Bon Scott of Long jings.

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Jan 10th, '13, 15:30
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Re: Xian Cha - Long Jing

by Evan Draper » Jan 10th, '13, 15:30

By the way, does anyone have a good source for buying such heat-resistant narrow glass tumblers from the US? It's the kind of thing you can just get at Walmart in China, but nobody in the states has any use for them apparently :( Your choices are either a shatter-prone bud vase or an over-insulated space age travel monstrosity.

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Jan 10th, '13, 22:36
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Re: Xian Cha - Long Jing

by bagua7 » Jan 10th, '13, 22:36

Tead Off wrote:Many myths associated with flash rinsing and 'cleaning' most teas.


How about this? Removing pesticide residue.

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Jan 13th, '13, 20:46
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Re: Xian Cha - Long Jing

by entropyembrace » Jan 13th, '13, 20:46

bagua7 wrote:
Tead Off wrote:Many myths associated with flash rinsing and 'cleaning' most teas.


How about this? Removing pesticide residue.


Pesticide residue is not very soluble in water. Rinse with dish soap or you're not accomplishing anything :P

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Re: Xian Cha - Long Jing

by Poohblah » Jan 13th, '13, 21:04

Evan Draper wrote:By the way, does anyone have a good source for buying such heat-resistant narrow glass tumblers from the US? It's the kind of thing you can just get at Walmart in China, but nobody in the states has any use for them apparently :( Your choices are either a shatter-prone bud vase or an over-insulated space age travel monstrosity.

Unfortunately, I've been on the same mission without much success. I think we should organize a group to do a large taobao buy for these tumblers. I especially like ones such as these: http://detail.tmall.com/item.htm?spm=a2 ... id=&pm_id= $12 on taobao, but if you could find it in the states, it would surely be $50.

Teahabitat has a few http://www.teahabitat.com/store/index.p ... cts_id=336, but I prefer the durable steel tumblers over glass.

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Jan 13th, '13, 23:43
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Re: Xian Cha - Long Jing

by jayinhk » Jan 13th, '13, 23:43

entropyembrace wrote:
bagua7 wrote:
Tead Off wrote:Many myths associated with flash rinsing and 'cleaning' most teas.


How about this? Removing pesticide residue.


Pesticide residue is not very soluble in water. Rinse with dish soap or you're not accomplishing anything :P


The HK Govt's Centre for Food Safety seems to disagree:

http://www.cfs.gov.hk/english/multimedi ... 35_03.html

Also this study from the Tea Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences seems to indicate some pesticides are very much water soluble (DDT isn't, but dimethoate, for example, very much is):

http://www.selamat.wur.nl/NR/rdonlyres/ ... ssment.pdf

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