Pu-Erh for beginners?

One of the intentionally aged teas, Pu-Erh has a loyal following.


Jul 24th, '13, 06:14
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Re: Pu-Erh for beginners?

by ChengduCha » Jul 24th, '13, 06:14

Poseidon wrote:So would you recommend someone starting out in the pu's to try shu first? Im looking to snag some samples soon and want to know where to start. Can pu-erh's be good if its not super old? What would you recommend for someone coming from primarily oolong and greens?


If you come from oolong and greens, shu or 20 year old sheng might not be for you.

If you're looking for the mouthfeel of quality oolong (lingering taste, changing flavors etc.) you're looking for higher end sheng that are still far cheaper than a good oolong on a per gram pricing basis.

Get some samples of house brand sheng cakes from YS that cost more than $50 per cake: http://www.yunnansourcing.us/store/cate ... y=20506203

Young sheng generally can be really astringent and doesn't go easy on the stomach. 6+ year old cakes can be a bit mellowed out already, but still aren't the right stuff to drink before breakfast.

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Jul 24th, '13, 12:20
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Pu-Erh for beginners?

by Poseidon » Jul 24th, '13, 12:20

ChengduCha wrote:
Poseidon wrote:So would you recommend someone starting out in the pu's to try shu first? Im looking to snag some samples soon and want to know where to start. Can pu-erh's be good if its not super old? What would you recommend for someone coming from primarily oolong and greens?


If you come from oolong and greens, shu or 20 year old sheng might not be for you.

If you're looking for the mouthfeel of quality oolong (lingering taste, changing flavors etc.) you're looking for higher end sheng that are still far cheaper than a good oolong on a per gram pricing basis.

Get some samples of house brand sheng cakes from YS that cost more than $50 per cake: http://www.yunnansourcing.us/store/cate ... y=20506203

Young sheng generally can be really astringent and doesn't go easy on the stomach. 6+ year old cakes can be a bit mellowed out already, but still aren't the right stuff to drink before breakfast.

That's good info! I've tried some puerh for my local tea shop but most of it (that isn't over priced) is flavored stuff. Ie. caramel puerh

I went ahead and got some samples late last night for a decent price. They had a good price for a glass gaiwan and cup so I naturally had to get some tea to christen it! :)

I added a screen shot of what I picked up. Does anyone have any experience with any of them? I read Hobbes review of the 05 tiandiren and it sounded pretty good! The rest were from intrigue or impulse clicking.

Image

Jul 24th, '13, 21:08
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Re: Pu-Erh for beginners?

by mr mopu » Jul 24th, '13, 21:08

The tangerine wrapped puerh I have tried. Some like it some don't as the tangerine flavor is really in the tea pretty strong.

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Jul 24th, '13, 21:56
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Pu-Erh for beginners?

by Poseidon » Jul 24th, '13, 21:56

mr mopu wrote:The tangerine wrapped puerh I have tried. Some like it some don't as the tangerine flavor is really in the tea pretty strong.

I'm quite interested in it. On occasion I do like a nice flavored tea. It will be a nice change of pace I think.

Jul 24th, '13, 23:43
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Re: Pu-Erh for beginners?

by ChengduCha » Jul 24th, '13, 23:43

I'd have chosen the organic one for the tangerine shu.

While I don't really trust organic labels in China, citrus fruits are famous world wide for undergoing heavy spraying, which accumulates in the skin and leach into your brew. Enjoy with caution.

I had some older green mark a while ago (96, 98?) which wasn't too exciting taste wise but had a meditative calming kind of cha qi, but I think they're all over the place from different factories, so yours might be very different.

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Jul 25th, '13, 09:27
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Re: Pu-Erh for beginners?

by Tead Off » Jul 25th, '13, 09:27

ChengduCha wrote:I'd have chosen the organic one for the tangerine shu.

While I don't really trust organic labels in China, citrus fruits are famous world wide for undergoing heavy spraying, which accumulates in the skin and leach into your brew. Enjoy with caution.

I had some older green mark a while ago (96, 98?) which wasn't too exciting taste wise but had a meditative calming kind of cha qi, but I think they're all over the place from different factories, so yours might be very different.

A good, longer, first rinse should help get some of the spray, if any, out of the brew. It's a good point you bring you up about citrus. I bought some balhyocha tea wrapped in citron on my last trip to Korea. I've grown to dislike it as the flavor has pervaded the tea to the point of little tea flavor. I would not buy again. Sort of a gimmick.

Aug 13th, '13, 00:35
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Re: Pu-Erh for beginners?

by genushumanusalice » Aug 13th, '13, 00:35

My samples and I have spent almost a month together now and are getting along well. I've tried 10 different teas, some shu some sheng and although I have enjoyed some of the shu (some has been just....urgh), my preference is definitely for the sheng.

Keeping in mind that my palette is completely new to pu-erh, so far two teas have stood out to me, a 2004 Menghai Square and 2009 Yong De Da Xue Shan Wild Arbor. The first was just a general overall pleasant experience while the latter has been completely different to any others, it tastes just like dried apricots to me and is quite astringent (I guess because it is quite young?) but at the same time sweet and very palatable.

Other raw teas I have tried include 2007 Xiaguan Golden 8100 Bowl, 2006 Dayi 7532 (Snow Mark) and 2003 Xiaguan 8653 Discus. The 2003 Xiaguan 8653 Discus is my least favourite.

Once I have finished with this lot of samples I'll try a bunch from another vendor and different makers and try to keep notes too, my memory isn't quite as good as I thought haha.

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Aug 13th, '13, 05:14
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Re: Pu-Erh for beginners?

by chrl42 » Aug 13th, '13, 05:14

Dayi Shus (cooked) are always a place for beginner, and Lao Tong Zhi too.

Then select some white paper-wrapped Gushu/Qiaomu from reputable vendors, best if they can offer samples from several regions.

Adequately stored adolescent (say around 10-yr) Shengs of economic brands - Jing Ye Hao, Yi Chang Hao, Xia Guan etc...it's how I usually treat beginner fellas :)

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Aug 13th, '13, 05:42
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Re: Pu-Erh for beginners?

by Tead Off » Aug 13th, '13, 05:42

Which Laotongzhi shengchas do you like chrl42?

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Aug 13th, '13, 05:56
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Re: Pu-Erh for beginners?

by chrl42 » Aug 13th, '13, 05:56

Tead Off wrote:Which Laotongzhi shengchas do you like chrl42?

I meant Shu, I generally don't like Haiwan Shengs too much.. :)

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Aug 14th, '13, 02:38
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Re: Pu-Erh for beginners?

by MarshalN » Aug 14th, '13, 02:38

I'd generally recommend drinking 2-3 years old shu, as new ones can have weird off tastes that are really not pleasant

Aug 14th, '13, 06:30
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Re: Pu-Erh for beginners?

by mr mopu » Aug 14th, '13, 06:30

MarshalN wrote:I'd generally recommend drinking 2-3 years old shu, as new ones can have weird off tastes that are really not pleasant

+1

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