Brewing woojeon

Made from leaves that have not been oxidized.


Apr 18th, '14, 17:42
Posts: 463
Joined: Feb 3rd, '14

Brewing woojeon

by bonescwa » Apr 18th, '14, 17:42

Should it basically be brewed like gyokuro? Although it seems to have a roasted taste, like Chinese greens, but when I brew it at a higher temp (170 F) it tastes flat and bitter. At 140 F with about 4-5g/150 ml and 90 sec its a bit subdued. Maybe this is the nature of the tea. I want to hear from people experienced with Korean tea, since this information hasn't been easy for me to find.

User avatar
Apr 18th, '14, 22:17
Posts: 1777
Joined: Mar 22nd, '08
Location: Beijing

Re: Brewing woojeon

by chrl42 » Apr 18th, '14, 22:17

Woojoen is of highest grade of Korean greens, similar to Gokyuro or 'Ming Qian' Longjing, the leaves are picked before mid-April, before the periodical rains. Usually brewed at around 60c...pretty low temp, or it's gonna be bitter! :)

User avatar
Apr 22nd, '14, 12:29
Posts: 5941
Joined: Jan 10th, '10
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Contact: debunix

Re: Brewing woojeon

by debunix » Apr 22nd, '14, 12:29

I am just finishing off my best session yet of woojeon from Morning Crane, which I started at 140 degrees--a delicious light, sweet, first infusion; kept the temperature the same for the second infusion, probably the least satisfactory of all, for seeming to concentrate what otherwise was only a slight hint of overcooked vegetables; then gradually increased temperature and timing for a series of lovely infusions where that delicate sweetness remains the primary impression, with the overcooked vegetables vanishing completely again by the 4th infusion or thereabouts. I'm about to do one more at 205, to enjoy the sweetwater end.

Apr 22nd, '14, 15:48
Posts: 463
Joined: Feb 3rd, '14

Re: Brewing woojeon

by bonescwa » Apr 22nd, '14, 15:48

debunix wrote:I am just finishing off my best session yet of woojeon from Morning Crane, which I started at 140 degrees--a delicious light, sweet, first infusion; kept the temperature the same for the second infusion, probably the least satisfactory of all, for seeming to concentrate what otherwise was only a slight hint of overcooked vegetables; then gradually increased temperature and timing for a series of lovely infusions where that delicate sweetness remains the primary impression, with the overcooked vegetables vanishing completely again by the 4th infusion or thereabouts. I'm about to do one more at 205, to enjoy the sweetwater end.


That's what I have too, I liked the sejak better. I think I can't appreciate the subtlety of this, so I push the steep time or leaf/water ratio and it gets bitter. I like the balhyocha the most. This tea in general is simple but I think that's the appeal for some people.

+ Post Reply