Everything you know is wrong ...

One of the intentionally aged teas, Pu-Erh has a loyal following.


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Aug 22nd, '08, 21:05
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by Salsero » Aug 22nd, '08, 21:05

Thanks for the link, Tom! Great article. I think last year Hop posted a link to some footage of that horse caravan from Yunnan to Beijing.

Honestly, I could care less about the health benefits of any tea ... as long as it's not killing me, I'm happy. (That reminds me, I still have to do the lead testing on those pots!)

But I and some other TeaChatters have tentatively expressed a preference for young sheng over old. Conditioning, I suppose: it's what we are used to.

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Aug 22nd, '08, 21:13
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Re: Everything you know is wrong ...

by chrl42 » Aug 22nd, '08, 21:13

TomVerlain wrote:"Besides, it's becoming too hard to find."


That's what I would give a credit for.

If he is a Pu Er expert, why would he not know 2~3 aged Sheng might ruin a stomach? Or why couldn't he find aged Sheng?

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Aug 22nd, '08, 21:15
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by shogun89 » Aug 22nd, '08, 21:15

I think I too and more fond of the young. We are just used to hearing over and over that aged is the best, we have become hypnotized. In my opinion just drink whatever the hell makes you happy. :D :D

Thanks for the article Tom!

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Aug 22nd, '08, 21:19
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by augie » Aug 22nd, '08, 21:19

IHT wrote:"Tea never goes bad, so it's a good investment," said Ji Xiaofeng, who manages a stall at Maliandao, Beijing's wholesale tea market.


That quote scares me. "Never goes bad" . . . what if it's stored in a barn next to your animals? What if it's stored in a damp shack with a truckload of mothballs or a gas powered generator? The mfgrs know what they're doing storage-wise; how about when some knucklehead gets a hold of it and stashes goodness knows where??? ewwwww . . . .

Thx for posting that link TV!

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Aug 22nd, '08, 23:19
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by puerhking » Aug 22nd, '08, 23:19

It never made sense to me that it would be harmful as it is treated like many other teas.....withered and wok treated.

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Aug 23rd, '08, 00:00
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Re: Everything you know is wrong ...

by Wesli » Aug 23rd, '08, 00:00

chrl42 wrote:If he is a Pu Er expert, why would he not know 2~3 aged Sheng might ruin a stomach? Or why couldn't he find aged Sheng?

Ditto to that. Forgive me if I don't even read that article.

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Aug 23rd, '08, 02:50
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by nada » Aug 23rd, '08, 02:50

I found this view a lot in mainland China where there are shops full of young Puerh, and no tea over a few years of age. In Taiwan, where there is more old puerh, I found the opposite view.

I would say that just about every shop owner there could describe themselves as a Puerh Expert to a foreign journalist and would be keen to sell as much of their stock as possible. It's a rare thing for a shop owner to advise you otherwise.

For myself, relying on intuition for this, I drink mostly young sheng puerh, with a pot of something older every few days. On the level of the qi, I definitely feel older puerh has more to offer - balancing the body & providing a feeling of wellbeing. That said, on a purely health point, I feel young sheng after a heavy meal is much better for breaking down fatty food. This is just my personal feeling. I'd be interested to hear how other people feel.

n.

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Aug 23rd, '08, 13:06
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by ABx » Aug 23rd, '08, 13:06

I think that the worst thing about this article is that it seems to be promoting investment speculation, and in a way that makes it seem like a sure thing. It fails to mention that the recently skyrocketing prices are due to the speculators. Just when it seemed that these speculators were figuring out that they have a closet full of poorly stored crap tea that nobody will want to buy when it's aged...

But yes, I tend to stay far away from any "tea expert" - especially a "puerh expert." Maybe they'll interview "Dr. Tea" next :P

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Aug 23rd, '08, 13:22
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by silverneedles » Aug 23rd, '08, 13:22

nada wrote: young sheng after a heavy meal is much better for breaking down fatty food.


if fat wasnt getting "broken down" and thus unable to be absorbed, fat would come out the other end (and be a very distinctive experience at that) and with it other nutrients and vitamins.... and in some time you end up with night blindness, skin problems, low calcium, osteoporosis, and bleeding. [this being a rather complete inability to absorb fat]

but i dont know if tea liquor that we drink has any emulsification properties

edit: it seems that green tea could actually INHIBIT digestion of fats ... <pubmed article>

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Aug 23rd, '08, 13:57
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by shogun89 » Aug 23rd, '08, 13:57

Dont even tell me that they are starting to find out that drinking tea may actually be bad for you. :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry:

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Aug 23rd, '08, 14:50
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by puerhking » Aug 23rd, '08, 14:50

here is what wikipedia says about Catechins:

Catechins constitute about 25% of the dry weight of fresh tea leaf[1], although total catechin content varies widely depending on clonal variation, growing location, seasonal/ light variation, and altitude. They are present in nearly all teas made from Camellia sinensis, including white tea, green tea, black tea and Oolong tea.

Catechins are also present in the human diet in chocolate[2], fruits, vegetables and wine[3] and are found in many other plant species[4].

Epigallocatechin gallate is the most abundant catechin in tea.

I would assume that puerh would be included in the lineup.

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Aug 23rd, '08, 14:53
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by PolyhymnianMuse » Aug 23rd, '08, 14:53

puerhking wrote:Epigallocatechin gallate is the most abundant catechin in tea.


Thank you good old EGCG :P

Is there any documentation of how much catechins actually affect the human body, and furthmore how much actually gets into your cup and your body from the leaf itself?

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