Whats in a word? Translation

One of the intentionally aged teas, Pu-Erh has a loyal following.


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Whats in a word? Translation

by Goose » Dec 4th, '08, 09:02

Yun and Hui gan both speak to the aftertaste of the tea, no? Are they interchangeable? Thanks,
Jim

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Dec 4th, '08, 10:06
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by Janine » Dec 4th, '08, 10:06

Well, here are babelcarp's returned definitions:


yun = (云 or 雲) [2] cloud(s), or short for Yunnan; or (韵 or 韻) [4] literally Rhyme, but in a tea context, Aftertaste

hui gan = (1) pleasant aftertaste, literally Returning Sweet (回甘) [2,1]; or, much less commonly, a less specific label for virtually any effect after the liquor has been swallowed, literally Returning Feeling (回感) [2,3]



So, perhaps colloquially they are often used for "aftertaste" but there are different shades of meaning to the term.

BTW I like Cary's Christmas cap :-)

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Dec 4th, '08, 19:04
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by Goose » Dec 4th, '08, 19:04

Thank you Janine for the reply, Yes it is the "shades of meaning" that I was hoping to explore.

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by tony shlongini » Dec 4th, '08, 20:47

It's spelled hui gan, but it's pronounced throatwarbler mangrove.

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by hop_goblin » Dec 4th, '08, 22:47

Cha yun refers to the sensations felt in the mouth while drinking the tea and Hui gan is the return sweetness or the aftertaste that continues to make us salivate after a good sip.

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by PolyhymnianMuse » Dec 4th, '08, 22:51

hop_goblin wrote:Cha yun refers to the sensations felt in the mouth while drinking the tea and Hui gan is the return sweetness or the aftertaste that continues to make us salivate after a good sip.


I understand Hui gan very well. Cha yun in terms of sensations like what though? Does that term refer to bitter, sweet, etc.?

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by Goose » Dec 4th, '08, 23:00

hop_goblin wrote:Cha yun refers to the sensations felt in the mouth while drinking the tea and Hui gan is the return sweetness or the aftertaste that continues to make us salivate after a good sip.


OK Ok , so that tingly feeling or feelings of "dryness" in the mouth/throat could be described as Cha yun?

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by Goose » Dec 4th, '08, 23:02

tony shlongini wrote:It's spelled hui gan, but it's pronounced throatwarbler mangrove.


Hmmm... I believe I have heard that somewhere before???? .. 8)

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by hop_goblin » Dec 5th, '08, 09:10

Goose wrote:
hop_goblin wrote:Cha yun refers to the sensations felt in the mouth while drinking the tea and Hui gan is the return sweetness or the aftertaste that continues to make us salivate after a good sip.


OK Ok , so that tingly feeling or feelings of "dryness" in the mouth/throat could be described as Cha yun?


Cha yun is hard to describe. Cha yun is the feelings you get from active tea. Sometimes, when you drink good tea, it feels like your throat has been massaged, or the pleasant sensations that just make you want to smack your lips after a good sip.

Imen has written a little on cha yun that you might enjoy reading.

http://tea-obsession.blogspot.com/2008/01/cha-yun4.html

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by Goose » Dec 5th, '08, 10:20

Thanks for the link Hop.
It seems as if there is an emotional component to the Cha yun then.

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by hop_goblin » Dec 5th, '08, 10:25

Goose wrote:Thanks for the link Hop.
It seems as if there is an emotional component to the Cha yun then.


Drinking tea should always have an emotional component! :D

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